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J.G. Keulemans

This page lists original publications that include illustrations by Johannes Gerardus Keulemans.

The books are ordered by publication date with the most recent at the top of the page.

Keulemans also produced plates for papers published in a number of journals. Separate pages on the site list papers with Keulemans plates that appeared in the BOU journal Ibis and in Novitates Zoologicae. Other journal related pages may be added at a later date.


J.G. Keulemans pages

There are a number Keulemans pages on the site:

Original publications with Keulemans illustrations

Later publications with Keulemans illustrations

Keulemans plates in scientific journals:

- Novitates Zoologicae

- Ibis 1905-1909
- Ibis 1900-1904
- Ibis 1895-1899
- Ibis 1890-1894
- Ibis 1885-1889
- Ibis 1880-1884
- Ibis 1875-1879
- Ibis 1870-1874

 

The Birds Of Australia

Gregory M. Mathews

Illustrations: J.G. Keulemans (Vol. 1 to 4), H. Grönvold, Roland Green, H. Goodchild, G.E. Lodge

Witherby

1910-1927

Originally issued in 75 instalments. These were collected in 12 volumes which were published by Witherby between 1910 and 1927. A 13th volume collected supplementary instalments.

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The Indian Ducks And Their Allies

E.C. Stuart Baker

Illustrations: H. Grönvold, G. E. Lodge, and J. G. Keulemans

Bombay Natural History Society

1908

Introduction:

"In 1896 the Honorary Secretary of the Bombay Natural History Society induced me to write a series of articles on our Indian Chenomorphe, and consequently the articles which commenced in Volume xi. of the ' Journal ' of that Society made their appearance. Since the publication of Hume and Marshall's ' Game- Birds,' no attempt has been made to collect the various notes which have from time to time been printed in the 'Asian,' 'The Indian Field,' and other sporting papers, as well as in the B. N. H. S. Journal itself, and it has been a matter of great difficulty - often an impossibility - for either sportsman or ornithologist to know what has already been recorded and what has not. Hence many interesting facts and finds were never recorded at all, and these articles were originally written as much with a view to elicit more information as to place on record in a compact form what had already been recorded. That the raison d'etre was a good one was shown by the immediate receipt by the Editors of the 'Journal ' of numerous notes, giving both information that was new and correcting part that was old. The present book aims at being a corrected, up-to-date edition of these papers, and incorporates, as far as possible, the additional information received since they were brought out.
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A Monograph Of The Petrels (Order Tubinares)

Frederick Du Cane Godman

Colour plates: J.G. Keulemans

Witherby & Co

1907

From the preface:

"My late friend and colleague Osbert Salvin for many years made a special study of the Order Tubinares, and together we collected specimens of Petrels from all available sources, thus amassing a large and valuable series, which, with the rest of our ornithological collection, numbering some 80,000 specimens, we finally presented to the Natural History Museum. It was Salvia's intention on the completion of the "Tubinares" for the twenty-fifth volume of the Catalogue of Birds in the British Museum, to write a fuller account of the Petrels, and publish it as a Monograph, illustrated by coloured figures of each species ; for that purpose we had some forty plates prepared by Mr. Keulemans, but Salvia's untimely death, in June, 1898, put an end to this project. Although naturally anxious to carry out my friend's intention, a good deal of extra work was now thrown upon my shoulders, and for some years I was too much engaged with the "Biologia Centrali-Americana" to embark on any fresh undertaking. As I hoped, however, at some future date to have more leisure, most of the remaining plates (106 in all) were drawn and coloured under my supervision, so as to be ready should opportunity occur. Having brought the unfinished volumes of the "Rhopalocera" and the "Aves" for the "Biologia" to a conclusion, my attention was again turned to the long intended Monograph, and with the able assistance of Dr. R. Bowdler Sharpe, of the Natural History Museum, I no longer hesitated to make a commencement. Professor Newton, one of our highest authorities on the Aves, writing to Sir Walter Buller, said, "All Petrels are puzzling in almost every way," and he goes on to say that though Salvin solved some of the puzzles, he doubted whether, in spite of the trouble he had taken and all the opportunities at his command, he would himself admit that he had completely disposed of all the difficulties of determination. Unlike my late colleague, I had made no special study of the Order, and had it not been for the promise of Dr. Sharpe's assistance, it would have been presumptuous in me to have undertaken so difficult a task. I have endeavoured to carry out the work on the lines projected by Salvin. Taking the Catalogue of Petrels as his guide, he proposed to omit the host of references belonging to the various species, and to quote only such as belonged to their history and distribution."
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Extinct Birds

Walter Rothschild

Illustrations: John Gerrard Keulemans, George Edward Lodge, Henrik Grönvold, Frederick William Frohawk, and Joseph Smit

Hutchinson & Co

1907

From the preface:

"When I decided to read a paper before the Ornithological Congress of 1905 on Extinct and Vanishing Birds, I found it necessary to illustrate my paper by a number of drawings. These drawings roused special interest among those who listened to my lecture, and I was asked by many if I could not see my way to publish the lecture and drawings, in book form, as these plates were far too numerous for the proceedings of the Congress. After some hesitation I determined to do this, greatly owing to the persuasion of the late Dr. Paul Leverkuhn. The preparation of a book required considerably more research than the lecture, and therefore my readers will find, in the following pages, a totally different account to that in the lecture, as well as corrections and numerous additions. The lecture itself has been published in the " Proceedings of the IVth International Ornithological Congress." I wish to thank very heartily all those of my ornithological friends, who have kindly helped me with the loan of specimens or otherwise, and especially Dr. H. O. Forbes, Dr. Scharff, Professor Dr. K. Lampert, Dr. O. Finsch, Professor Dr. A. Koenig, Dr. Kerbert, Mr. Fleming, Dr. von Lorenz, and others."
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The Birds Of Tierra del Fuego

Richard Crawshay

Illustrations: J. G. Keulemans

Bernard Quaritch

1907

From the introduction:

"The Birds dealt with in this work do not claim to represent absolutely every species occurring in Tierra del Fuego; but they are, I believe, the most comprehensive collection yet made in the island, and include many recorded from there for the first time. Such as it is, this collection is the work of my own hands. Alone as I was, an amateur, these results were not attained otherwise than slowly and laboriously, indeed wearily enough at times; for although the greatest consideration was shown me by the white settlers, conditions of life in this region are hardly conducive to work of the kind. Fellow travellers, then, who have practical experience of what Bird-collecting means in the earth's bye-ways - where so many pursuits claim their share of attention, and there is always one's life to live from day to day - will understand something of the effort involved. As to this book, it is of the nature of a work of the kind that, no matter how assiduously or how long one may apply oneself, there abides with the conscientious author the knowledge at heart that the result is not as satisfactory as he could wish. Such is my feeling. The further I have progressed the more have I come to realize the immensity of the subject, to say nothing of collateral questions arising by the way. Its scope, in fact, is well nigh infinite. All I claim for this effort in the direction of comprehending it is that I have done my best."
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Mongolia I Kam

Volumes 1 to 5

P.K. Kozlov

(Mongolia And Kham: Achievements Of The Geographical Association Expeditions In Imperial Russia 1899-1901)

1905-1907

Language: Russian

The majority of volume five of this five volume publication is a description of the birds recorded on the expedition. The final few pages of this section include four colour plates by J.G. Keulemans. These are the only Keulemans plates in the publication.

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Supplement To The Birds Of New Zealand

Walter Lawry Buller

Illustrations: J.G. Keulemans and others

Published by the author

1905

From the preface:

"Seventeen years have now elapsed since the publication of my Second Edition of the 'Birds of New Zealand.' During that period several new and interesting species have been discovered, a number of wanderers or stragglers, from Australia and elsewhere, have been detected on our shores, and much detailed information, more or less important, has been obtained respecting most, if not all, of the species described in that work. I have thought it better, instead of bringing out a new edition of so expensive a book, to issue a Supplement of two volumes, conforming in their style and appearance to the original Vols. I. and II., in which all this new material will be embodied, and coloured illustrations given of species not figured in the former volumes. I have taken this opportunity of reclassifying the avifauna of New Zealand according to the most modern system of arrangement, namely that adopted by Dr. Bowdler Sharpe in his recently published 'Handlist of Birds'; so that, although in the nature of a 'Supplement' forming, as it were, a necessary acquisition for those who possess my former work, the present publication is virtually complete in itself, embracing all the known species."
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A Monograph Of The Genus Casuarius

Walter Rosthchild

With a Dissertation on the Morphology and Phylogeny by W. P. Pycraft

Plates: J.G. Keulemans

Transactions of the Zoological Society of London, Vol. XV, Part V

Zoological Society of London

1900

Opening lines:

"The genus Casuarius is the typical genus of the group Casuarii of the Palaeognathae (Ratitae of former authors), and inhabits the Papuan subregion, i.e. New Guinea with the islands in Geelvink Bay, Salwatty, New Britain, the islands of the Aru group, Northern Queensland, and the island of Ceram in the Moluccas. The Cassowaries are evidently separable into a great many local forms, apart from the few very distinct good species; but owing to their large size, to the uncertainty about the localities of the living specimens that are brought to Europe, and to the disappearance after death of the most characteristic coloration and structure of the bare skin on the head and neck, our knowledge of the species is doubtless still limited. The material which I have been able to study is very large compared with that available in most Museums. For several years I have tried to procure a great number of living specimens and of skins as well, and I have been able to place numerous fresh bodies and skeletons before Mr. Pycraft, whose appended paper will, I trust, be of great value for the study of the anatomy of the Palaeognathae."
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Bulletin Of The Liverpool Museums

Vol. II, Nos. 3 and 4

Editor: H.O. Forbes

1900

Includes a 32 page paper:

Catalogue of the Charadriomorphic Birds (Charadriformes): Auks (Alcidae), Gulls (Laridae), and Skuas (Stercorariidae) - Lari; Lark-plovers (Thinocoridae), Stone-curlews (Oedicnemidae), Jacanas (Jacanidae), Sheathbills (Chionidae), Crab-plovers (Dromadidae), Coursers (Cursoriidae), Plovers and Snipes (Charadriidae) - Limicolae; Pigeons (Columbae), and Sand-grouse (Pterocles), in the Derby Museum

Henry O. Forbes and Herbert C. Robinson

The paper includes 2 colour plates by J.G. Keulemans.

(It is possible that other volumes of the Bulletin Of Liverpool Museums include Keulemans plates. The only other volumes examined to date include plates by J. Smit but not by Keulemans.)

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Natal Birds

R.B. and J.B.S. Woodward

Illustrations by J.G. Keulemans and others

P. Davis

1899

"Including the Species Belonging to Natal and the Eastern Districts of the Cape Colony."

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A Monograph Of The Turdidae, Or, Family Of Thrushes

Henry Seebohm

Edited and completed after the author's death by R. Bowdler Sharpe

Illustrations: J.G. Keulemans and possibly others

Henry Southeran & Co

1898-1902

From the introduction:

"In the present work I trust that I have carried out the intentions of my friend, the late Mr. Henry Seebohm, when he conceived the idea of writing a 'Monograph of the Turdidae, or Family of Thrushes.' Shortly after the completion of the fifth volume of the 'Catalogue of Birds,' Mr. Seebohm made preparations to publish a Monograph of the Thrushes, a group of birds of which at that time he had a profound knowledge, and until his death in 1895 he continued to employ Mr. Keulemans in drawing the Plates for the book which he intended to issue. Nearly all the Plates which illustrate the present volumes were prepared during Mr. Seebohm's lifetime, and were coloured in anticipation of their speedy publication. Several have been since added by the Publishers in order to bring the work up to date."
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Coloured Figures Of The Birds Of The British Islands

Issued by Lord Lilford

Illustrations: A. Thorburn, J.G. Keulemans and others

R.H. Porter

1898

An 8 volume work that collects colour plates and accompanying text that were originally printed and supplied to subscribers in 36 parts between 1885 and 1897. The first 7 volumes comprise the previously circulated plates and text. The 8th volume adds appendices and an index. The volumes are as follows:

  • Volume 1: Raptors and Owls, 51 colour plates

  • Volume 2: Woodpeckers, Kingfishers, Nightjars, Swifts, Crows, Shrikes, Swallows, Tits, Wrem, 54 colour plates

  • Volume 3: Sparrows, Thrushes, Warblers, Dipper, Wagtails, Pipits, 66 colour plates

  • Volume 4: Larks, Buntings, Finches, Doves, Grouse, Pheasants, Partridge, Rails, 65 colour plates

  • Volume 5: Bustards, Waders, 59 colour plates

  • Volume 6: Terns, Gulls, Skuas, Auks, Divers, Grebes, Petrels, Shearwaters, 65 colour plates

  • Volume 7: Cormorant, Herons, Storks, Ibis, Wildfowl, 61 colour plates
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Histoire Du Bimaculated Duck De Pennant

Andre Suchetet

2 colour plates: J.G. Keulemans

Lille: Imprimerie Typographique Et Lithographique Le Bigot Freres

1899

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Catalogue Of The Plataleae, Herodiones, Steganopodes, Pygopodes, Alcae and Impennes In The Collection Of The British Museum

Catalogue Of The Birds In The British Museum, Volume XXVI

Plataleae and Herodiones: R. Bowdler Sharpe

Steganopodes, Pygopodes, Alcae, Impennes: W.R. Ogilvie-Grant

14 colour plates: J. Smit, J.G. Keulemans

Printed By Order Of The Trustees

Sold by: Longman & Co.; B. Quaritch; Kegan Paul, Trench, Trubner & Co.; and at the British Museum (Natural History)

1898

Preface:

"The present volume, though not numerically the last, has been, owing to various delays in its production, the last to appear. Its publication completes the series, as originally projected by Dr. Gunther more than twenty-five years ago. The whole work consists of twenty-seven volumes, and it may fairly claim to be one of the most important aids to the study of Systematic Ornithology which has ever been produced. The first volume appeared in June 1874. The others have followed at intervals averaging rather less than a year. The publication of the work has therefore been very nearly coincident with Dr. Gunther's administration of the Zoological Department of the Museum. It is to him that the general arrangement and supervision of the work is due, although each contributor has been allowed a considerable latitude in following his own views as to the details of classification and nomenclature. It was at first contemplated that Dr. R. Bowdler Sharpe would undertake the whole work, and the first four volumes were completed by him between the years 1872 to 1879, It, however, soon became apparent that continually increasing curatorial duties (which rapidly augmented, in consequence of the inflow of specimens mainly stimulated by the publication of these volumes) required very much of his attention, and notwithstanding the energy with which he threw himself into the work, it was manifestly impossible for him single-handed to complete the Catalogue within any reasonable time. The assistance of other ornithologists was hence invoked to take up certain groups, to the study of which they had been known to have specially devoted themselves. These were, in the order in which their aid was given, Mr. Henry Seebohm, Dr. H. Gadow, Mr. P. L. Sclater, Mr. 0. Salvin, Mr. E. Hartert, Mr, W. R. Ogilvie-Grant, Mr. E. Hargitt, Captain Shelley, Count Salvadori, and Mr. Howard Saunders. The special contributions of each of these authors will be seen in the list of volumes and their contents. Dr. Sharpe, however, did not relinquish his labours on the Catalogue at the end of the fourth volume. Not only did he materially assist in many of the volumes produced under the names of other authors, but for seven more volumes (making eleven altogether) he is entirely, and for two others he is partly, responsible. Some indication of the amount of his share in the whole work may be gained by the statement that out of 11,548 species described in the Catalogue 5181 are contained in Dr. Sharpe's portion, and 6367 in those parts written by the ten other authors."
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The Naturalist In Australia

W. Saville-Kent

Illustrated by 50 full page collotypes, 9 colour plates by Keulmans and other artists, and over 100 illustrations in the text

Chapman & Hall

1897

Includes one colour plate "specially executed for this work by the talented bird artist J.G. Keulemans."

From the preface:

"The endeavour is made in this volume to present to the English reading public a few glimpses of the Faunal and Floral products of that magnificent component of our Empire the Island-Continent of Australia. No attempt is made here to produce a systematic monograph or anything beyond a general compendium of any particular group or groups, the purpose being more in the direction of recording data concerning the life phenomena or peculiarities of biological types that specially attracted the author's attention during the period of close upon twelve years in which he acted as Commissioner of Fisheries, or specially engaged Fisheries expert to the greater number of the Australian colonies, and in the fulfilment of which professional engagements he extended his travels throughout the entire Australian coast-line. The material here selected for description and illustration will, it is trusted, assist towards the promotion of a wider interest in the natural history wealth in sea and on shore possessed by the Australian peoples, and conduce towards its more intimate investigation both by dwellers on the land and by systematic explorers. Concerning many of the subjects here dealt with, as for example the form, habits, and architectural fabrications of the Termites and the varieties, distribution, and bizarre manners of many members of the Bird and Lizard races, a wide field is open both for original investigation and for inexhaustible recreation to every intelligent observer."
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A Hand-Book To The Primates, Volume II

Henry O. Forbes

Editor: R. Bowdler Sharpe

Colour plates: J.G. Keulemans

Lloyd's Natural History

Edward Lloyd Limited

1897

Published in two volumes.

Editor's preface:

"The prefatory remarks in the preceding volume explain the purport of the "Hand-book" of the Primates, which has been undertaken by Dr. Forbes. I hope that the portion of the work devoted to the geographical distribution of these animals will be found to be of some interest; but, as explained by the author, the meagreness of the material in Museums renders the definition of the exact habitats of Mon- keys extremely difficult."
This work was subsequently published by John F. Shaw and Company as part of the Allen's Naturalist's Library with the title Monkeys.

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A Monograph Of The Lories, Or Brush-Tongued Parrots Composing The Family Loriidae

St. George Mivart

Colour plates: J.G. Keulemans

R.H. Porter

1896

From the introduction:

"The Parrots which constitute the family Loriidae are a very attractive group of rather small birds. None of them are nearly so large as the Macaws, or even as the common Grey Parrot (Psittacus erithacus), but vary in dimension, from the size of a Turtle-Dove to about that of a Sparrow. They consist of 75 more or less distinct species, and thus very largely exceed in number not only the nearly extinct family of Nestoridae (with only 3 living species), but also the families Cyclopsittacidae (19 species) and Cacatuidae (27 species), even taken together. On the other hand, they are enormously exceeded by the immense family of the Psittacidae. This last-named group is divided into six subfamilies as follows : the Nasiterninae, with 9 species; the Conurinae, with 102 species; the Pioninae, with 91 species; the Psittacinae, with 8 species; the Palaeornithinae, with 112 species; and, lastly, Platicercinae, with 50 species. Finally the aberrant family Stringopidae contains only 2 species. Therefore the Lories form less than one-sixth part of the whole Order Psittaci. The family is remarkable for its brilliancy and gay coloration; but it is not only the appearance of these birds which makes them so attractive. Some of them, as those of the genus Chalcopsittacus, will spontaneously approach human dwellings, and most of them make excellent pets, except for those persons who cannot tolerate the shrill cries they frequently emit. Some caged individuals have been let free, in suitable weather, and found to return voluntarily to their habitual dwelling-place. They appear, however, to be very indifferent talkers, and of several species kept in captivity it is recorded that they never spoke at all. The Lories are very choice feeders, living as they do on the nectar and pollen of flowers, and mainly on the blossoms of the Eucalypti and coral trees."
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Catalogue Of The Limicolae In The Collection Of The British Museum

Catalogue Of The Birds In The British Museum, Volume XXIV

R. Bowdler Sharpe

8 colour plates: J.G. Keulemans

Printed By Order Of The Trustees

Sold by: Longman & Co.; B. Quaritch; Kegan Paul, Trench, Trubner & Co.; and at the British Museum (Natural History)

1896

Preface:

"The delay in the publication of the present volume has been caused by the fact that the labour involved in its preparation has far exceeded my expectations. The specimens arranged and catalogued in it are 13,440, exclusive of many hundreds of duplicates. The references quoted in the synonymy are 18,892. With the exception of a few books, which proved to be inaccessible, the whole of this mass of literature has been actually consulted. The collection of specimens is a truly wonderful one. Of the 255 species recorded, the British Museum contains 250, and the types are 68 in number. It is in connection with the distribution of birds like the Limicolae that one is able to estimate the value of those great donations which have been made to the Museum by Mr. A. 0. Hume, Major Wardlaw Ramsay, and Messrs. Salvin and Godman. In many instances the entire range of a species is demonstrated by the series of skins in the collection. The Wading-Birds were also special favourites with the late Mr. Henry Seebohm, whose work on the geographical distribution of the Charadriidae is the most important treatise on the group. His untimely death last year deprived the Museum of one of its best friends; but by his generous bequest the collection of Limicolae has been greatly enriched, as will be seen by the long list of 'Addenda,' which consist chiefly of specimens presented by Mr. Seebohm."
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A Hand-Book To The Primates, Volume I

Henry O. Forbes

Editor: R. Bowdler Sharpe

Colour plates: J.G. Keulemans

Lloyd's Natural History

Edward Lloyd Limited

1896

Published in two volumes.

Editor's preface:

"The great increase in our knowledge of animals which has taken place since the volume on Monkeys was published in "Jardine's Naturalist's Library" some sixty years ago, cannot be better illustrated than by the fact that our excellent contributor, Dr. H. O. Forbes, has found it impossible to compress that knowledge into a single volume of the present issue. There is, moreover, no Museum which contains such a complete series of skins of the Primates, as to render a perfect "monograph" of the Order possible. Dr. Forbes has endeavoured in these volumes to bring the subject up to date, and has devoted some years of study to the two which now appear under his name, and he has had the great advantage of having seen many of the species of which these volumes treat, in a state of nature. If diligent research and patient work, combined with a sound anatomical knowledge and an acquaintance with many species of Monkeys in their natural habitat, avail anything, then these volumes should present to the student a more concise epitome of the characteristics of the Primates than any other essay yet offered to the public. It has been found impossible to reproduce any of the plates in the old "Naturalist's Library" of Jardine. They would have formed, with appropriate inscriptions, a very good instalment of a series of "Comic Natural History" volumes, as they were, in fact, nothing but a set of extraordinary caricatures of Monkeys. I have, therefore, again to acknowledge the liberality of the publishers, in adopting my suggestion that a perfectly new set of illustrations should be prepared. These have been executed by Mr. J. G. Keulemans, with a result, I hope, that will satisfy the reader."
This work was subsequently published by John F. Shaw and Company as part of the Allen's Naturalist's Library with the title Monkeys.

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Supplement To A History Of The Birds Of Europe Forming Volume IX

Additional Species Found To Occur In The Western Palearctic Area

Henry E. Dresser

Illustrations: J.G. Keulemans, J. Wolf, E. Neale, and others

Published by the author

1895-1896

From the preface:

"Since the completion of the 'Birds of Europe,' I have several times contemplated the issue of a Supplement, but have deferred so doing until I had collected sufficient material to make a volume at least as large as any one of those forming the original work. It was suggested to me by more than one subscriber that I should revise each article in the original work, bringing the same up to date; but I found that a thorough revision, adding all the material that has since accumulated, would fill at least three if not four volumes, and that it would really be tantamount to bringing out a new edition, and I have therefore preferred merely to treat of such species as have to be added to those in the original work, and should a new edition be required I shall probably issue the same in the form of a concise handbook, condensing the information into as small a space as possible."

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Catalogue Of The Chenomorphae, Crypturi and Ratitae In The Collection Of The British Museum

Catalogue Of The Birds In The British Museum, Volume XXVII

T. Salvadori

19 colour plates: J. Smit, J.G. Keulemans

Printed By Order Of The Trustees

Sold by: Longman & Co.; B. Quaritch; Kegan Paul, Trench, Trubner & Co.; and at the British Museum (Natural History)

1895

Preface:

"The numbers of the species of Birds treated of in this Volume, and of the specimens at present in the Collection, are as follows: Chenomorphae, 205; Crypturi, 65; Ratitae. 26. In none of the preceding volumes has the number of desiderata been so small as in the present; only eight species of the Anseres, seven of the Tinamous, and four of the Ratitae being entirely unrepresented by specimens in the Museum. Beside the 67 types of recognized species, the Collection contains 25 other typical specimens which are now regarded as referable to species previously named and described. The unrivalled collection of Tinamous formed by Messrs. Godman and Salvin, and supplemented by the loan of numerous specimens from Continental Museums, has enabled the author to discriminate considerably more species than his predecessors were inclined to admit. The Hon. Walter Rothschild, whose collection of Apteryx far surpasses that in the British Museum, has given most valuable assistance in the preparation of this Catalogue by lending these as well as other specimens to the author. The present volume concludes the series of the 'Catalogue of Birds.' Thanks to the energy with which Count Salvadori has applied himself to the work, its publication precedes that of Volumes 24, 25, and 26. However, it will be followed immediately by Volume 25, which contains the Gulls and Petrels, while it is a matter of regret that no such prospect can be held out as regards the other two volumes. In a final volume it is intended to give a supplementary list of the species described since the publication of the several volumes, and an Index to the whole work."
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A Chapter On Birds: Rare British Visitors

R. Bowdler Sharpe

18 colour plates: J.G. Keulemans

Society For Promoting Christian Knowledge

1895

From the preface:

"Those treated of in the present volume have occurred but seldom - they will never be common residents, in our time at least - and to learn about their habits, we must go further afield. It will, I believe, be of some interest to students of British Ornithology to read something about the life-history of the species, which Mr. Keulemans has here depicted, and I have had great pleasure in putting together a few notes on some of these most interesting avian visitors from foreign parts. Naturally, much of the information on their habits has had to be extracted from the writings of naturalists who have had the good fortune to meet with the species in life. The works of Mr. Seebohm, especially, have been laid under contribution, because it is impossible to write about our rarer British birds without quoting from him. No one has taken the pains that Mr. Seebohm took, before writing his "History of British Birds," to travel into all parts of Europe, and even into Siberia, to learn something about the nesting habits of the rarer species of European birds; and, with the exception of those of Naumann and Macgillivray, there is no work so full of original observation as the above-mentioned one of Mr. Seebohm. In America there are several excellent books on the habits of birds, and the observations of Captain Bendire in his "Life History of North American Birds," and those of Mr. W. H. Hudson on South American Birdlife, are amongst the most important of modern contributions to our knowledge of Natural History. In these little essays, therefore, I have not hesitated to draw upon the information published by those who have seen these rare species in their native haunts, and I have quoted freely from the writings of Lord Lilford, Canon Tristram, Colonel Irby, Mr. Howard Saunders, and others, but it is to Mr. Seebohm that I am especially indebted. I have also striven to give these chapters a wider scope, and have said a few words on the natural relations of the species, so as to give a little general information on the families to which they belong. The pictures which Mr. Keulemans has drawn, are, in my opinion, among the best which the present generation owes to his talented brush, and the way in which they have been reproduced in chromolithography, by Messrs. Riddle and Couchman, not only demands my warmest acknowledgment, but, I believe, that they will be thoroughly appreciated by all lovers of birds."
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Catalogue Of The Fulicariae (Ralidae and Heliornithidae) And Alectorides (Aramidae, Eurypygidae, Mesitidae, Rhinochetidae, Gruidae, Psophiidae, And Otididae) In The Collection Of The British Museum

Catalogue Of The Birds In The British Museum, Volume XXIII

R. Bowdler Sharpe

9 colour plates: J.G. Keulemans

Printed By Order Of The Trustees

Sold by: Longman & Co.; B. Quaritch; Kegan Paul, Trench, Trubner & Co.; and at the British Museum (Natural History)

1894

Preface:

"The numbers of the species of the nine families treated of in the twenty-third volume, and of the specimens at present in the Collection, are as follows: Rallidae, 187; Heliornithidae, 4; Aramidae, 2; Eurypygidae, 2; Mesitidae, 1; Rhinochetidae, 1; Gruidae, 19; Psophiidae, 6; Otididae, 30. In the first category 29 forma are included which are considered by the author to be of only subspecific rank, while 33 species and subspecies are still unrepresented in the Collection of the Museum. Beside the 49 types of recognized species, the Collection contains 27 other typical specimens which are now relegated to the synonyms. As in the preceding volumes, the series of specimens of the American and Indian species are derived chiefly from the Hume, Tweeddale, and Godman-Salvin Collections; but they have been largely supplemented by a generous donation from Mr. Seebohn. For other additions to this volume the Trustees are indebted to the Right Hon. Lord Lilford, Colonel Irby, Mr. H. 0. Forbes, Mr. P. L. Sclater, and Mr. F. W. Styan."
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A Monograph Of The Pittida, Or Family Of Ant-Thrushes

Daniel Giraud Elliot

Colour plates: William Hart, D.G. Elliot, J.G. Keulemans, P. Oudart, Maupert

Bernard Quaritch

1893-1898

From the preface:

"In the interval of time which has elapsed since my first Monograph of the Pittidse was completed, now thirty ago, not only have many new and beautiful species been discovered, but much information of the economy and habits, even of those birds long known to us, has been obtained, and it seemed that the time had arrived to gather all our knowledge of these attractive creatures into one publication, and exhibit the portraits of the new forms - or, in other words, produce an entirely new Monograph. This is what the present work purports to be. I have discarded the text of the earlier Monograph, and have written this one, beginning with the first records of these birds that were admissible in our science, as if the subject had only now for the first time engaged my attention. A few of the Plates of the first edition have been retained in this one, but the majority are new drawings by Mr. W. Hart of London, made, unless otherwise stated, from specimens in the collection of the Brit Museum. How well Mr. Hart has accomplished his portion of the task, a glance at the beautiful Plates will readily testify. In the plan of the work the method I have been accustomed to adopt in all of my illustrated Monographs has been followed, and it has been my endeavour to include in the text all the information accessible that could be desired either by the ornithologist or casual reader. Errors may have crept in (they generally do), but especial care has been taken to reduce them to a minimum. We cannot, happily for us, all think alike, but wherever I have differed from my brother naturalists my decision has only been formed after careful study and the reasons for my conclusions clearly given."
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A Monograph of the Coraciidae, or Family of the Rollers

Henry Eeles Dresser

Notes on the anatomy and osteology: Frank E. Beddard

Colour plates: J.G. Keulemans

Published by the author

Printed by Francis & Taylor

1893

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The Avifauna of Laysan and the Neighboring Islands with a Complete History to Date of the Birds of the Hawaiian Possessions

Walter Rothschild

Illustrations: J.G. Keulemans

R.H. Porter

1893

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Catalogue Of The Game Birds (Pterocletes, Gallinae, Opisthocomi, Hemipodii) In The Collection Of The British Museum

Catalogue Of The Birds In The British Museum, Volume XXII

W.R. Ogilvie-Grant

Colour plates: J.G. Keulemans (4), J. Smit (4)

Printed By Order Of The Trustees

Sold by: Longman & Co.; B. Quaritch; Kegan Paul, Trench, Trubner & Co.; and at the British Museum (Natural History)

1893

Preface:

"The present volume treats of four Orders of Birds, constituting the greater bulk of what are commonly termed Game Birds. The numbers of species described and of specimens at present in the Collection are as follows: Pterocletes, 17; Gallinie, 384; Opisthocomi, 1; Hemipodii, 24. In the first category those forms are included to which, in the author's opinion, no higher than subspecific rank should be assigned; only 23 of these species and subspecies are still unrepresented in the Collection. Beside the 102 types of recognized species the Collection contains 50 other typical specimens which are now considered identical with previously named species."
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Catalogue Of The Columbae or Pigeons In The Collection Of The British Museum

Catalogue Of The Birds In The British Museum, Volume XXI

T. Salvadori

15 colour plates: J.G. Keulemans

Printed By Order Of The Trustees

Sold by: Longman & Co.; B. Quaritch; Kegan Paul, Trench, Trubner & Co.; and at the British Museum (Natural History)

1893

Preface:

"The Collection of Pigeons in the British Museum consists of 7359 specimens, referred by the Author to 415 species. Only about one tenth of the species known are unrepresented in the Collection; they belong chiefly to the Austro-Malayan and Polynesian Faunas; whilst of other species the series of specimens are almost complete, having been obtained from the donations of Mr. A. Hume, and especially of Messrs. Godman and Salvin, who were collecting specimens of Pigeons for many years with the view of preparing a completely illustrated Monograph of the Order. I have again the pleasure of acknowledging the conscientious attention which the Author has given to this work in all its details, and which renders it a worthy companion to the preceding volume of this Catalogue."
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Catalogue Of The Picariae In The Collection Of The British Museum

Coraciae continued and Halcyones (Leptosomatidae, Coraciidae, Meropidae, Alcedinidae, Momotidae, Todidae, and Coliidae)

Catalogue Of The Birds In The British Museum, Volume XVII

R. Bowdler Sharpe

17 colour plates: J.G. Keulemans (16), J. Smit (1)

Printed By Order Of The Trustees

Sold by: Longman & Co.; B. Quaritch; Kegan Paul, Trench, Trubner & Co.; and at the British Museum (Natural History)

1892

From the preface:

"The present Volume contains an account of the remaining families of the suborder Coraciae as understood by Seebohm, as well as of the Halcyones, Bucerotes, and Trogones. The numbers of the species of the nine families treated of, and of the specimens at present in the Collection, are as follows: Leptosomatidae, 2; Coraciidae, 25; Meropidae, 36; Alcedinidae, 183; Momotidae, 21; Todidae, 5; Coliidae, 10; Bucerotidae, 68; Trogonidae, 47. Of these 397 species, only 16 are wanting to the collection of the Museum, and more than one-fourth of them are represented by the types; but besides these there are 30 other typical specimens now considered identical with previously named species. In many cases the series of specimens is sufficiently complete to illustrate the whole geographical range of a species - a result chiefly due to the accession of the great faunistic collections referred to in the previous volumes, and also to numerous recent donations, of which those made by the Lords of the Admiralty, Dr. Jayakar, W. D. Gumming, Esq., and Captain Mochler Ferryman should be specially mentioned. The Tweeddale Collection contained nearly the whole of the materials described in Dr. 8harpe's Monograph of the Alcedinidae."
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Catalogue Of The Picariae In The Collection Of The British Museum

Upupae, Trochili and Coraciae (Cypselidae, Caprimulgidae, Podargidae, and Steatornithidae)

Catalogue Of The Birds In The British Museum, Volume XVI

Upupae, Trochili: Osbert Salvin

Coraciae: Ernst Hartert

14 colour plates: J.G. Keulemans

Printed By Order Of The Trustees

Sold by: Longman & Co.; B. Quaritch; Kegan Paul, Trench, Trubner & Co.; and at the British Museum (Natural History)

1892

From the preface:

"The preparation of the present volume was commenced in the year 1887, but its publication has been delayed from several causes: the desire of profiting by the most recent attempts at classification rendered changes in the serial arrangement of the families necessary; Mr. Salvin, who at first intended to undertake the whole of the Macrochirous families, together with the Podargidae, was prevented by other engagements from proceeding beyond the Trochilidae, so that a substitute had to be introduced to the work; and, finally, the material to be catalogued was unusually heavy, as it not only comprises the two largest collections of Humming-Birds that have been made hitherto, viz. those of the late Mr. J. Gould and of Messrs. Godman and Salvin, but was also increased by the accessions of the last four years. Consequently the contents of this volume greatly exceed those of any of the previous ones, as will be seen from the following statement: Upupae, 16; Trochili, 482; Cypselidae, 78; Caprimulgidae, 86; Podargidae, 24; Steatornithidae 1. Of the 687 species recorded, 50 are not represented in the Museum; but besides the 211 types of species admitted as valid, the Collection contains 62 other typical specimens, the names of which are now relegated to the synonymic lists. With regard to the types of Trochilidae, their number cannot bo given with absolute certainty, as Gould did not always pay regard to distinctive labelling or to the preservation of individual specimens which he would have wished to be regarded as the types of the species named and described by him."
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The Birds Of Devon

W.S.M. D'Urban and Rev. Murray A. Mathew

R.H. Porter

1892

Includes 4 colour plates by J.G. Keulemans (Black Redstart, Montagu's Harrier, Rough-Legged Buzzard and Great Black-headed Gull)

From the introduction:

The County Histories of Birds, so many of which have been published of late years, have helped to show that in the British Isles, considering their area, the Avifauna is very dissimilar in its distribution. The East differs from the West, the North from the South, an inland county from a maritime one, in variety and number of species. This arises from many causes, the chief depending upon the points at which migrating birds arrive and depart, and these landing-places are selected according to the position of the mountain-ranges and the character of the coast- line. County histories of birds also serve to indicate the changes in a local Ornis since pre-railway times. Much might be written as to the influence of railways upon our native Fauna: they have invaded quiet bird-sanctuaries; they have rendered others accessible to gunners from a distance; they have carried the "collector" everywhere; they have prompted and made possible the improvements in agriculture of the present day, which while they have banished some birds have conduced to the multiplication of others.
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Catalogue Of The Psittaci or Parrots In The Collection Of The British Museum

Catalogue Of The Birds In The British Museum, Volume XX

T. Salvadori

18 colour plates: J.G. Keulemans

Printed By Order Of The Trustees

Sold by: Longman & Co.; B. Quaritch; Kegan Paul, Trench, Trubner & Co.; and at the British Museum (Natural History)

1891

From the introduction:

"In the spring of 18S9 I was asked by Dr. Gunther to undertake the volume of the Catalogue containing an account of the Parrots; and now, after more than two years and a half, my work is completed. The materials I have had to deal with, although very large, and no doubt the most extensive existing in any Museum, are much less complete than those belonging to other groups of birds: and I do not consider them adequate either for affording a solid base to a general classification of Parrots, or for fully illustrating the different stages of many of the species. The number of specimens contained in the British Museum is 5113, belonging to 450 species, whilst 49 are not represented in the Museum; so that the total number of species admitted in the present Catalogue is 499, of which 13 are now described for the first time. The number of apparently good species represented by their types is 108, besides 47 others now relegated to the synonymy. Out of these 5113 specimens 118 are osteological preparations, belonging to 53 species."
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Catalogue Of The Picariae In The Collection Of The British Museum

Catalogue Of The Birds In The British Museum, Volume XIX

Scansores and Coccyges: P.L. Sclater

Indicatoridae, Capitonidae, Cuculidae and Musophagidae: G.E. Shelley

Colour plates: J. Smit (4), J.G. Keulemans (9)

Printed By Order Of The Trustees

Sold by: Longman & Co.; B. Quaritch; Kegan Paul, Trench, Trubner & Co.; and at the British Museum (Natural History)

1891

From the preface:

"The present volume contains an account of the remaining families of the suborder Scansores, and of those of the suborder Coccyges. The arrangement of three of these families, which are entirely composed of Neotropical forms, was undertaken by Mr. P. L, Sclater, that of the remainder by Captain G. E. Shelley. The numbers of species of the several families, and of the specimens at present in the Collection of the British Museum, are as follows: Indicatoridae, 12; Capitonidae, 112; Rhamphastidae, 59; Galbulidae, 21; Bucconidae, 43; Cuculidae, 176; Musophagidae, 25. Of the 448 species recorded, 32 are not represented in the Museum; but besides the 73 types of species admitted as valid, the Collection contains 50 other typical specimens the names of which are now relegated to the synonymic lists. Of donations not already mentioned on former occasions, I have to refer to the two following, which were specially useful in supplementing the series of specimens catalogued in the present volume: the entire collection of Cuckoos formed by Mr. H. Seebohm, and consisting of 539 specimens; and a valuable series of South-African birds collected by T. and W. Ayres in Natal and the Transvaal for the late Mr. J. H. Gurney, and presented by his son."
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Monograph Of The Paradiseidae, Or Birds Of Paradise And Ptilonorhynchidae, Or Bower-Birds

R. Bowdler-Sharpe

Illustrations: W. Hart, J. Gould, J.G. Keulemans

Henry Southeran

1891 (Vol 1), 1898 (Vol. 2)

Originally published in 2 large folio volumes (in 8 original parts). Comprises 79 hand coloured lithographic plates by William Hart. 52 of these are based on his own artwork, the others are based on artwork by John Gould and John Gerrard Keulemans. Other editions of this work have subsequently been published.

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Scientific Results of the Second Yarkand Mission: Aves

R. Bowdler Sharpe

Illustrations: J.G. Keulemans, J. Smit, W. Hart

Published by order of the Government of India

Printed by Taylor And Francis

1891

One of the 14 parts of the Scientific Results.

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The Birds of Sussex

William Borrer

6 colour plates: J.G. Keulemans

R.H. Porter

1891

With 6 colour plates and a folding, coloured map.

From the preface:

"It is now nearly a hundred years since Markwick, the friend and correspondent of Gilbert White, read before the Linnean Society, on May 5th, 1795, his Catalogue of Birds found in the county of Sussex,' numbering 168 species, including those which are domesticated. About the year 1800, Mr. Woolgar, of Lewes, made a list of birds observed by him in that neighbourhood, which may be found in Horsfield's 'History of Lewes.' In 1849, Mr. Knox published the first edition, and in 1855 the third, of his 'Ornithological Rambles in Sussex,' quoted in this work as "O. R." Since that time, as far as I am aware, no attempt has been made to give a comprehensive account of its avifauna; there are, however several local Societies, as those of Brighton, Chichester, Eastbourne, Hastings, and Lewes, which, from time to time, publish their 'Transactions,' and doubtless do good work in their respective districts. There is also a Museum at Chichester, and one at Brighton, as well as the splendidly mounted collection of the late Mr. Booth, recently made over to that town. There have been, and there still are, many accurate observers who contribute accounts of interesting occurrences in the county to the pages of 'The Zoologist,' especially Mr. Dutton, Mr. Jeffery, Mr. Monk, and Mr. Wilson, who for many years have been its correspondents."
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The Birds Of Devonshire

William E.H. Pidsley

Editor: H.A. MacPherson

Frontispiece: J.G. Keulemans

W.W. Gibbings/J.G. Commin

1891

Preface:

"The exciting cause of this handbook must be looked for in the omission of other Devonshire Naturalists to provide a book of reference on the Ornithology of our County; an omission that may perhaps be accounted for, by the seriousness of the undertaking. The great size of the county, and the large quantity of published notes to be explored, rendered the completion of the task more difficult than I had at all anticipated. Accordingly I thankfully availed myself of the friendly co-operation of the Rev. H. A. Macpherson, who, since the beginning of the present year, has laboured assiduously at the improvement of the text. I have received the sympathetic support of many other naturalists, and tender my grateful thanks to all whose names are mentioned in the text. Though it is impossible to enumerate them here, I can not but express my special obligations to the Rev. M. A. Mathew, Mr. H. E. Rawson, Mr. Mitchell of Tavistock, Dr. Elliot, Mr. Nicholls, Mr. J. H. Gurney, and the Rev. T. C. Green of Modbury, for assistance received. I am, myself, solely responsible for the revision of proofs, and claim the kind indulgence of critics for country printers. The classification and nomenclature adopted are those of Mr. Howard Saunder's list of British Rirds."
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Dogs, Jackals, Wolves, And Foxes: A Monograph Of The Canidae

St. George Mivart

Woodcuts and colour plates: J.G. Keulemans

R.H. Porter

1890

Preface:

"Many years have now elapsed since any general work was published on the subject to which this volume is dedicated. Its object is to make known and describe the species and leading varieties of existing wild Canidae. For this purpose the rich and unrivalled stores of Canine animals accumulated in the British Museum of Natural History have been most liberally and kindly placed at the disposal of the author by the authorities of that Institution. The writer cannot hope to have in all cases rightly determined the vexed questions as to the limits of species and varieties and those of synonymy. He trusts, however, by means of his studies, by full references to the literature concerning each species, and by carefully drawn figures from nature, and some- times from life, to have at least provided a fresh starting point whence new explorations into the Natural History of the group may fruitfully take place. To facilitate this, he has been careful to have drawn, when possible, the actual types of original descriptions, and no less than fourteen representations of such types have been here figured. The author desires to express his warm thanks for the kind aid given him by his scientific friends; especially by Professor Flower, C.B., F.R.S., Dr. Gunther, F.R.S., Dr. P. L. Sclater, F.R.S., Mr. Blanford, F.R.S., Mr. Oldfield Thomas, F.Z.S., and Mr. R. Lydekker, F.G.S. He also desires to record his grateful sense of the zeal, patience, and skill with which his Plates have been executed by Mr. J. G. Keulemans."
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On the Ornithology of Northern Borneo

R. Bowdler Sharpe

With notes by John Whitehead

Colour plates: J.G. Keulemans

Volume 31, Issue 4

Ibis

1889

A 34 page paper. Two colour plates by Keulemans: Orthnocichla Whiteheadi and Allocotops Calvus.

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Argentine Ornithology: A Descriptive Catalogue Of The Birds Of The Argentine Republic, Volume 2

P. L. Sclater

With notes on their habits by: W. H. Hudson

Colour plates: J.G. Keulemans

R.H. Porter

1889

Preface:

" This volume contains our account of all the Orders of Birds met with within the Argentine Republic except the Passeres, which were treated of in the First Volume. It also comprises an Appendix and Index, and completes the work. The Introduction is issued with this, but is intended to be bound up with the first volume, and is paged to follow the contents of that volume. The total number of species which we have thus assigned to the Argentine Avifauna is 434. To this list, no doubt, considerable additions will have to be made when the more remote provinces of the Republic have been explored. We trust that this work may at least serve to excite residents in Argentina to make fresh investigations, for we are quite aware how imperfect is the compilation now offered to the public. It will be seen that in the following pages, as in the first volume, we have availed ourselves liberally of the information on Argentine birds contained in the writings of Dr. Burmeister, Mr. Barrows, and Mr. Gibson. To all of these gentlemen we wish to offer our most sincere thanks, together with apologies for the liberty we have taken. We have likewise to express our high estimation of the valuable notes which we have extracted from the published writings of the late Henry Durnford and Ernest William White, both most promising Naturalists, and both alike lost to Science at an early age. Nor must we omit to record our thanks to Hans, Graf von Berlepsch, of Miinderi, Mr. Walter B. Barrows, and Mr. Frank Withington, and other friends and correspondents who have aided us by information and by the loan of specimens. To the Zoological Society of London and to Mr. Henry Seebohm we are likewise much indebted for the loan of the woodcuts of which impressions are contained in these volumes."
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Argentine Ornithology: A Descriptive Catalogue Of The Birds Of The Argentine Republic, Volume 1

P. L. Sclater

With notes on their habits by: W. H. Hudson

Colour plates: J.G. Keulemans

R.H. Porter

1888

Preface:

"The present volume contains an account of the Passeres of the Argentine Republic, which, as at present known, number some 229 species. The second volume, which it is hoped will be ready in the course of next year, will be devoted to the history of the remaining Orders of Birds, and will also contain the Introduction and Index, and complete the work. All the personal observations recorded in these pages are due to Mr. Hudson, while I am responsible for the arrangement, nomenclature, and scientific portions of the work. I have to acknowledge with many thanks a donation of £40 from the Royal Society, which has enabled Mr. Hudson to devote a portion of his time to the compilation of his interesting notes."
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The Geographical Distribution Of The Family Charadriidae, Or The Plovers, Sandpipers, Snipes, And Their Allies

Henry Seebohm

Illustrations: J.G. Keulemans and possibly others

Henry Southeran & Co

1888

From the preface:

"About twenty years ago Mr. J. E. Harting began to collect information relating to the group of birds commonly called the Limicolae, with the intention of publishing a monograph of them. In the course of his studies he contributed from time to time articles on this group of birds to 'The Ibis' and to the 'Proceedings' of the Zoological Society; but subsequently his attention drifted into other channels, until in 1884 he abandoned the idea of writing a monograph, and offered his collection of birds for sale. I was then writing on the British species belonging to the group, which had always been an especial favourite of mine, and was glad of the opportunity of making my collection more complete. I therefore bought the Harting collection, which, with the Swinhoe collection, already in my Museum, and the Shelley collection of African Limicolae since acquired, provided me with ample material for study as soon as the last part of the 'History of British Birds' had gone to press. The result of this study is the present volume. Acting in accordance with the old proverb "bis dat qui cito dat," I determined not to write a monograph. What I had to say on the habits of these birds I had already said in the work referred to: on the other hand, I found that the study of all the species contained in the group threw quite a different light upon their geographical distribution, and enabled me to correct what appeared to be errors in their classification - their mutual relationship, in fact; so I determined to make these two subjects the theme of the book."
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Our Rarer Birds : Being Studies In Ornithology & Oology

Charles Dixon

Illustrations: Charles Whymper

Frontispiece: J.G. Keulemans

Richard Bentley & Sons

1888

From the preface:

"The following Studies deal principally with the habits and economy of those rarer British birds which, from the remote and secluded districts they frequent, the localness of their distribution, and their shy and retiring disposition, do not come very generally under the notice of casual observers. In wandering through the woods or along the shore, or over the mountains and the moors, the observer often obtains a cursory glimpse of these our rarer birds; the object of this volume is to enable him to identify them, and to make him familiar with their habits and characteristics. Fifteen years of my life have been spent in this labour of love - in gathering from personal observation the facts which are here recorded. The greater part of these pages has been written in the places where my information was obtained - in field and forest, on mountain and cliff, with the birds themselves around me. The naturalist may doubtless find some facts new to him in these Studies, and many questions relating to the economy of birds have been discussed. In the following pages I have always endeavoured to lead the observer to a contemplation of those higher questions of Natural Science which Ornithology so aptly illustrates, and to put him in the way of appreciating the scientific value of his researches. I also believe that in publishing my observations within the compass of a single volume, I am filling a want long felt by field naturalists, who have hitherto only been able to obtain any information respecting our rarer birds from large and costly works on British Ornithology. In making my selection of our rarer birds from the four hundred species which are regarded as British, I have used every care, weighing impartially the claims of each to bie so considered. "Our Rarer Birds," so far as the purposes of the work before us are concerned, are species that cannot be met with everywhere, like the Robin and the Thrush, the Sparrow and the Swallow; and in addition I have laid it down as a sine qua non that each must breed within the confines of the British Islands. In this I follow the ornithological axiom that a bird's breeding-place is its true home. Exception has only been made in the case of the Knot; and I am pleased to see that the Snow Bunting's nest has been actually obtained in Sutherlandshire, at an elevation of nearly three thousand feet. The classification I have adopted is what seems to me the most natural, although the many gaps in my list of species, which only a selection of British birds necessarily entails, breaks much of the proper order of sequence. Probably the classification of birds is as far from a definite and natural settlement as ever it was, no two authorities agreeing in their ideas as to the relative value of anatomical characters. Where doctors disagree so woefully, it is not possible within the restrictions of space here laid down either to discuss the pros and cons of scientific arrangement, or to become responsible for any new departure. This work is written for the lover of birds, not for the student of their pedigree or the quibbler over their classification."
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Catalogue Of The Passeriformes or Perching Birds In The Collection Of The British Museum

Fringilliformes: Part III, containing the family Fringillidae

Catalogue Of The Birds In The British Museum, Volume XII

R. Bowdler Sharpe

16 colour plates: W. Hart, J.G. Keulemans

Printed By Order Of The Trustees

Printed by Taylor & Francis

1888

From the introduction:

" The number of specimens of Fringillidae recorded in the present volume is 9443, exceeding by several thousands the contents of any previous volume of the 'Catalogue of Birds.' The number of species recorded is 559, of which only 30 are unrepresented in tbe Museum collection, which contains likewise the types of no less than 125 species. The line of demarcation between the families Fringillidae and Tanagridae seems to be an extremely arbitrary one, and many genera included by me as Finches are just as likely to be Tanagers, if there is really a definable character for the separation of the two families. I allude more especially to such forms as Piezorhina, Chamoeospiza, Coryphospingus, &c. Some distinctive characters may ultimately be discovered in the anatomy of the Fringillidae and Tanagridae which will serve to separate them; but at present the whole classification of these birds is highly unsatisfactory."
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The Unknown Horn of Africa: An Exploration from Berbera to the Leopard River

Frank Linsly James

Illustrations: W.D. James, Percy Aylmer, Rose Hake, J.G. Keulemans

Jan Van Voorst

1888

From the preface:

"I regret the length of time which has passed between our exploration of the 'Unknown Horn of Africa,' as represented by the land of the Somal, and the publication of any detailed account of the expedition; but I hope the lapse of three years has not rendered the production of 'yet another book on Africa' a superfluity. As long as any part of inhabited Africa remains unsearched and undescribed, so long shall a certain amount of public interest attach itself to it. The semi-civilised Somal, as met with at Aden, is familiar to every traveller who passes through the Red Sea; but his native land, with the exception of part of the coast region, had remained a sealed book to Europeans until the accomplishment of the journey which I have endeavoured to describe in these pages."
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A Vertebrate Fauna of Sutherland, Caithness and West Cromarty

J.A. Harvie-Brown & T.E. Buckley

Illustrations: J. G. Keulemans and others

David Douglas

1887

One plate, of a Snow Bunting, by Keulemans.

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The Birds Of Cumberland Critically Studied, Including Some Notes On The Birds Of Westmorland

Rev. H. A. MacPherson & William Duckworth

Colour frontispiece: J.G. Keulemans

Chas. Thurnham & Sons

1886

From the preface:

"To working ornithologists, the maritime counties of England are essentially of primary interest, both fi'om the numerous species which regularly haunt the seaboard and estuaries, and from the frequent occurrence of rare European forms upon the coastline. When, therefore, I came to Cumberland, in 1882, I naturally asked myself, 'What is the Avi-fauna of this county?' An examination of faunal literature shewed that, while the counties of Durham and Northumberland, of Yorkshire, Lincolnshire, Norfolk, Sussex, Cornwall, and Somerset, had been treated of exhaustively, or in part, by Messrs. John Hancock (1874), W. E. Clarke (1881), J. Cordeaux (1872), H. Stevenson (1866-70), A. E. Knox (1849), E. H. Rodd (1880), Cecil Smith (1869), the literature of the Aves of the north-west of England was wholly of a meagre and unsatisfactory character! I at once decided to devote every fragment of leisure to the elucidation of the Avi-fauna of Cumberland, and sought the fullest information on all hands, visiting all districts and sifting every fact presented to me with the utmost care."
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The cruise of the Marchesa to Kamschatka & New Guinea

F.H.H. Guillemard

Maps and woodcuts drawn by: J.G. Keulemans, C. Whymper and others

Engraving: Edward Whymper

Published in two volumes

John Murray

1886

Opening lines:

"However blase or disillusioned a traveller may have become, there must surely be something in the first glimpse of a new land to arouse in him a more than ordinary interest. His last expedition has been, perhaps, a failure. He has projected a book on the religions of West Africa, and has discovered that the gods he has intended for illustration have been constructed in Birmingham ; or he has been hunting in the far interior of the Dark Continent, and has found a billiard talkie and a Good Templars' Lodge where he had hoped for elephants.^ If he be a naturalist he has possibly experienced more instances than he could wish of the destructive powers of the white ant, or, worse fate still, he has reached his journey's end with no collections to destroy. But, with a new country lying before him, all these recollections vanish, and, even if its exploration be impracticable, he none the less conjures up the images of its infinite possibilities It was with some such thoughts as these in my mind, that I found myself gazing one morning in June, 1882, at the southern point of the island of Formosa, regretting that we had but a few days to devote to it. Day was just breaking, and our new acquaintance seemed to wish to show herself under her most attractive aspect. A calm sea, brushed into crisp ripples by the early morning breeze, led the eye up to a wide stretch of bay lying right ahead of us.."
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Catalogue Of The Passeriformes or Perching Birds In The Collection Of The British Museum

Fringilliformes: Part I, containing the families Dicaeidae, Hirundinidae, Ampelidae, Mniotiltidae and Motacillidae

Catalogue Of The Birds In The British Museum, Volume X

R. Bowdler Sharpe

12 colour plates: J.G. Keulemans

Printed By Order Of The Trustees

Printed by Taylor & Francis

1885

From the introduction:

"In the present volume 448 species are described, represented by 4590 specimens. Of these the Museum contains the types of 88, and 52 species are still desiderata to the collection. The series of Neotropical birds has been rendered wonderfully complete by the addition of the collections of Dr. Sclater and of Messrs. Salvin and Godman; whilst through the hearty co-operation of Professor Baird, on behalf of the United-States National Museum, numerous valuable North- American birds have been received during the past year. The collection of the Old-World species of the families described in the present volume is also tolerably perfect; and many of the migratory species are represented by series of specimens illustrating their geographical distribution in a full and satisfactory manner. Much remains to be done to complete our knowledge of the changes of plumage of the Wagtails and Pipits. In my study of the latter birds I have not relied solely on the series in the British Museum, but I have likewise examined the collections of Canon Tristram, Capt. Wardlaw-Eamsay, Capt. Shelley, Mr. Seebohm, and Mr. F. Nicholson, to each of whom I return my thanks."
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The Birds Of Lancashire

F.S. Mitchell

Colour plates: J.G. Keulemans

Illustrations: Victor Prout and others

John Van Voorst

1885

A 2nd edition was published in 1892 by Gurney & Jackson with engravings by G.E. Lodge replacing the colour plates by Keulemans.

From the introduction:

"This book has been written mainly as a chapter on geographical distribution, a subject which of late years haa deservedly received a large share of attention from naturalists, and which when thoroughly worked out for tbe whole of the British Islands, may be expected to show results both interesting and valuable. It may well be doubted whether the system of taking the counties as limits is not an exceedingly ill-chosen one, but research has in so many instances progressed on these lines, and local enthusiasm is so much more readilly stimulated in this direction, that scarcely any choice is left for those portions of the country whose faunal condition yet waits investigation. It can hardly be denied that it would have been far better if, in the division of the ground for local work, regard had been had to physical configuration, and the river valleys, the mountain chains, and the sea coasts had been taken as boundaries by observers; but the compiler of some future day will have to gather these results for himself, and to collate and compare from this and like histories, whose limits of observation are so arbitrarily defined."
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A Monograph of the Meropidae or Family of the Bee-Eaters

Henry Eeles Dresser

Colour plates: J.G. Keulemans

Published by the author

Printed by Francis & Taylor

1884-1886

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Sketches Of Bird Life; From Twenty Years Observation Of Their Haunts & Habits

James Edmund Harting

Illustrations: Wolf, C. Whymper, Keulemans, Thorburn

W.H. Allen & Co

1883

From the introduction:

No matter what the time of year, or place, in which we take a country ramble, some feathered favourite, we may be sure, will greet us with welcome note, or arrest our attention by some peculiarity of habit. In the early spring, as we wander through the larch plantations just coming into leaf, the songs of the Blackcap and the Garden Warbler reach the ear before we can see the authors of the notes'; and, behind the ambush of the nearest tree, we have not long to wait before we are enabled to catch a glimpse of the tiny summer visitors which annually perform their marvellous journeys from the south to pass the summer in our sea-girt isle. Lower down in the brake, where the tangled briars have caught and held the wind-strewn leaves of the past year, forming a pleasant couch for the outlying rabbit, the liquid notes of the Nightingale are heard, now mournfully prolonged, anon hurriedly brought to a close at our approach, until, as curiosity prompts a closer inspection, the dull-brown bird quits its ambush, and flying low for a few yards is again lost to view amongst the dense underwood. From the top of a larch tree the Thrush pours forth its varied melody, making the woods resound, and the challenge is taken up by a rival in the next plantation. The startled Blackbird, as we quit the copse, flies hurriedly down the ditch with noisy vociferation, and pausing for a moment upon a gatepost, with many a flirt of the tail, dashes wildly into cover again and disappears. In the hedgerows, as we pass along and mark the budding whitethorn, the restless, garrulous Whitethroat comes suddenly into view, and, poised for an instant upon a topmost spray, stands out against the sky, a very picture for soft colouring and graceful outline. Near the farmstead on a bough overhanging the rickyard sits the Greenfinch, giving forth its monotonous though not unpleasant call-note, occasionally dropping down amongst the Sparrows to share a meal with them. Hard by a pair of Robins have decided upon a nest in the woodstack, where for the last two years they have successfully reared their young. From the leafy branches of an elm is heard the spring song of the Chaffinch, whose conspicuous colours and active habits do not suffer him to remain long unrecognised.
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Manual Of The Birds Of New Zealand

Walter L. Buller

Illustrations: J.G. Keulemans and others

Colonial Museum and geological Survey Department

1882

From the preface:

"The Catalogue of the Birds of New Zealand published by this department in September, 1871 having been long out of print, and there being a general demand for something to take its place, Dr. Buller has prepared the following Manual for the use of students in the colony, in anticipation of a more comprehensive work on the subject which he has in progress. As a matter of convenience, the author has consented to adopt the classification, as well as the descriptive portion, of the above-named Catalogue, introducing only such corrections in the text as appeared to be absolutely necessary, and altering the nomenclature in accordance with his own published views on various disputed points. At the same time all doubtful forms have been expunged, while the newly discovered species have been added, bringing the total number up to 176; and brief sketches of life-history have been incorporated, drawn almost entirely from the author's classical "History of the Birds of New Zealand," a work of such merit that, although it has only been published for eight years, it is now considered a book of rare value. The accompanying plates are reductions, by a new application of photo-lithography, from the inimitable drawings by Keulemans which form the coloured illustrations to that work, with the addition of four more, copied from other sources. The woodcuts, in illustration of the generic characters, were specially executed for this Manual."
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Monograph Of The Bucerotidæ, Or Family Of The Hornbills

Daniel Giraud Elliot

Illustrations: J.G. Keulemans

Published by the author

1882

From the preface:

"Could an interest in any ornithological group only be created by the beauty of dress or gracefulness of form of its various members, it might possibly happen that the Bucerotidae would not be selected as the subject for an illustrated monograph; and while their full value is always accorded to these attributes, perhaps occasionally even in an exaggerated degree, yet as Nature never made an ugly object (even the most repulsive thing so called being admirably and wonderfully fitted for the place it is destined to fill in life), beauty of plumage and symmetry of form are by no means the only causes that lead a naturalist to choose any one group as an especial object for study. The very peculiar appearance of the majority of the birds contained in this volume, as well as the extraordinary habits and structure common to all, which make them to differ from other feathered creatures, together with the generally meagre accounts of many of the species, only to be met with by searching numerous publications, were the chief reasons that induced me to select this family as the subject of my fifth illustrated monograph. Scattered as the species are over many countries, it has not fallen to the lot of any one ornithologist to observe all of them in their native haunts ; but beside what could be gathered from published accounts, to be found in various journals written in many languages, I have been most kindly aided by those who have enjoyed opportunities of observing certain species in the localities where the birds dwell."
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A Monograph Of The Jacamars And Puff-Birds, Or Families Galbulid And Bucconid

P.L. Sclater

Colour plates: J.G. Keulemans

R.H. Porter

1882

Preface:

"The Jacamars and Puff-birds formed the subject of some of my earliest studies in Ornithology. Of the former of these families I published a Synopsis in 1852, of the latter in 1856. Since those dates I have not failed to add to my series of examples of both these groups whenever the opportunity has presented itself. Assisted by the additional materials thus acquired, and by the excellent collection of the birds of both these groups in the cabinets of my friends Salvin and Godman (which has been placed unreservedly at my service), it has been a great pleasure to me to go over former ground and to do my best to give a complete account of what is as yet known of the Jacamars and Puff-birds. I trust that the work now completed will be found worthy to rank along Avith other similar well-known Monographs that have been lately issued, and to find a place next to them on the book-shelves of my brother Naturalists. I have to acknowledge the cordial assistance received from many friends during the progress of this work, and especially the kind aid rendered to me by Mr. W. A. Forbes, who has provided me with some most valuable notes on the anatomy and osteology of the birds of these two groups."
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Catalogue Of The Passeriformes or Perching Birds In The Collection Of The British Museum

Cichlomorphae: Part III, containing the first portion of the family Timeliidae

Catalogue Of The Birds In The British Museum, Volume VI

R. Bowdler Sharpe

18 colour plates: J.G. Keulemans

Printed By Order Of The Trustees

Printed by Taylor & Francis

1881

From the introduction:

"The present volume treats of the first portion of the large family Timeliidce, or Babbling-Thrushes, a group which is largely represented in the Old World, but contains only a few members in the American continents. Five subfamilies have been described in the present volume, viz. the Bulbuls, the Wrens, the Mocking-Thrushes, the Solitaires, and the Bower-birds, The total number of species enumerated is 407; and of these the Museum possesses 315. The specimens in the collection are 1508 in number. The gaps in the series are principally among the South-American Wrens, of which it is peculiarly difficult to procure examples. Of the many important additions that have been made to the collection during the past two years, the most notable (that of the collection of the late Mr. Gould) was not acquired before part of the present volume was in the printer's hands, and consequently the additions which it brought have had to be relegated to the 'Addenda' at the end of the volume."
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Catalogue Of The Passeriformes or Perching Birds In The Collection Of The British Museum

Cichlomorphae: Part II, containing the family Turdidae (Warblers and Thrushes)

Catalogue Of The Birds In The British Museum, Volume V

Henry Seebohm

18 colour plates: J.G. Keulemans (16), J. Smit (2)

Printed By Order Of The Trustees

Printed by Taylor & Francis

1881

Preface:

"The Fifth Volume of the 'Catalogue of the Birds in the British Museum' contains an account of all the species of Warblers and Thrushes known at present; it has been prepared by Mr. H. Seebohm, whose special acquaintance with this group of Birds is probably unequalled. The total number of species described amounts to 344, of which no less than 303 are in the British Museum; they are represented by 2560 examples. Of the principal donors we have to mention the author himself, Capt. Stackhouse Pinwill, F. DuCane Godman and 0. Salvin, Esqrs., Lieut.-Col. Irby, Lord Lilford, and Canon Tristram. The frequent occurrence on the following pages of the name of B. H. Hodgson, Esq., is a testimony of the lasting value of the collections which he deposited in the Museum nearly forty years ago."
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Matabele Land And The Victoria Falls: A Naturalist's Wanderings In The Interior Of South Africa

Frank Oates

Editor: C.G. Oates

Illustrations: J. G. Keulemans, R. Mintern, W. H. Fitch

C. Kegan Paul

1881

From the preface:

"In offering to the public the following pages, I feel, as editor, that I owe a few words of apology and explanation to the reader by way of preface - apology for the imperfections of the volume; explanation how such imperfections have arisen. The traveller whose journey to the Zambesi is here recounted died of fever a few days after he had left that river on his way homewards, and the book has been compiled from his note-books, and letters home. The latter were written with no view of publication; the former were intended only for the writer's own subsequent use and as suggestive guides to memory. It is always a question in such a case how far the surviving friends of the deceased writer or traveller do well in publishing the unfinished labour of his pen. What his own wish would have been cannot be known, or even guessed at, unless specially expressed; and the reflection forcibly presents itself to the mind that perhaps a certain injustice may be done to the memory of the dead by publishing, in a form which may fairly challenge the criticism of the general reader, a few hasty jottings by the wayside, written under circumstances the least favourable to literary composition, and a limited number of letters home, meant merely for the perusal of the writer's nearest and most indulgent friends. On the other hand, however, it must be borne in mind that, much as must inevitably be lost in editing pages such as these for want of the inspiring touch which the writer himself could alone have finally given them, there will probably be a directness and freshness of the expressions which a traveller makes use of on the spot, hampered as he then is by no oppressive consciousness that he is addressing that imaginary "public" - consisting after all but of a number of individuals like himself, all with the same human heart and interests, - which might be wanting in his more matured work."
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Biologia Centrali-Americana

Aves

Volume I-III: Text

Volume IV: Plates

Authors: Frederick DuCane Godman and Osbert Salvin

Assistance with Volume III: R. Bowdler Sharpe and W. Ogilvie-Grant

Colour plates: J.G. Keulemans

1879-1904

From the introduction:

The enumeration of the Aves of Mexico and Central America was commenced in September 1879 by the late Osbert Salvin and myself, and is now completed in four Volumes, three of text and one of plates. Salvin's long-continued ill-health, and sudden death in 1898, greatly retarded the conclusion of the Third Volume, which was subsequently finished by me with the assistance of Dr. R. Bowdler Sharpe and Mr. Ogilvie-Grant. On this account, too, it has been decided to abandon all idea of a Supplement, and to close the volumes as they stand. The critical examination of the large amount of additional material that has come to hand during the progress of publication, and the analysis of the extensive literature on the subject issued in recent years, could only have been dealt with satisfactorily with the assistance of Salvin himself, and I am reluctantly compelled to leave this portion of the subject untouched. It may be noted, however, that the additions are mainly amongst the Passeres, which were completed in 1892. The physical features of the whole region are described in the Preface to the Lepidoptera Ehopalocera, concluded in 1901, and in the Appendix to the Botany, published in 1887, and need not be again repeated here. This Introduction will therefore be chiefly devoted to some remarks on geographical distribution, to the journeys made by us in Central America, and the sources from which our material has been obtained, concluding with a Table showing the distribution of the Families and Species as arranged in this work. To make this latter as complete as possible, the additional countries whence specimens were subsequently received are, however, specially indicated.
For more information see the Biologia Centrali-Americana page

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Biologia Centrali-Americana

Mammalia

Volume author: Edward R. Alston

Introduction: P.L. Sclater

Colour plates: J.G. Keulemans, J. Smit

1879-1882

From the opening section:

One of the most striking characters of the Mammalian fauna of Central America is the presence of Monkeys, a group which, in the New World, is entirely confined to the Neotropical Region. Both the families, and six out of the ten genera, of American Monkeys are represented within our limits by at least eleven species. The existence of these animals north of the Isthmus of Panama, though long over- looked by zoologists, was recorded by several of the older voyagers, of whom William Dampier and Lionel Wafer may be specially mentioned. Some of their quaint observations seem worthy of being reproduced; and they may best be given here, as it is not always possible to determine the exact species to which they refer.
For more information see the Biologia Centrali-Americana page

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A History Of The Birds Of Ceylon

W. Vincent Legge

Plates: J.G. Keulemans and others

Privately printed

1879-1880

A 3 volume work.

From the preface:

"Of late years Ornithology has made more rapid strides than perhaps any other branch of zoological research. In Oriental regions more particularly many naturalists have, within the last quarter of a century, prosecuted their studies with the greatest vigour ; enormous collections have been made, entirely new regions explored, and their avifauna investigated with all that energy which collectors of the 19th century bring to bear on their work and doings in the forests of the tropics. The pens of Blyth, Jerdon, Wallace, the Marquis of Tweeddale, Swinhoe, Pere David, and Allan Hume have brought our knowledge of the avifauna of India and the countries to the eastward of it to a high degree of perfection. At the time of the author's arrival in Ceylon much had been done by Layard, and the results of his labours were being largely added to by the researches of Mr. Holdsworth; but nevertheless, up to that period, no complete treatise on the birds of the island had been written. As a rising British colony, with fast developing resources and wealth, an increasing European community, and an educated element in the native population, the production of a book on its avifauna which should take a place in the series of zoological works which are invariably the outcome of civilization seemed to the author a positive necessity."
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Scientific Results of the Second Yarkand Mission: Mammalia

W.T. Blanford

Illustrations: J.G. Keulemans, J. Smit, and others

Published by order of the Government of India

Printed by Superintendent Of Government Printing

1879

From the preface:

The following notes upon the specimens of mammalia collected by the late Dr. Stoliczka when accompanying the mission sent by the Government of India in 1873-74 to Kashghar must be considered as only a contribution to the zoology of the countries traversed. Some additions have been made from the collections obtained by Dr. Henderson, who accom- panied a former mission to Yarkand, and by Dr. J. Scully, who visited Eastern Turkestan as Medical Officer with Mr. B. B. Shaw, the Political Agent, despatched by the Government of India in 1874-75 to visit the Amir of Kashghar. It is, however, impossible to give anything like a complete list of the mammalia inhabiting Eastern Turkestan, the Pamir, and Wakhan. Even of Ladak, which is easy of access, and yearly traversed by English sportsmen and travellers, although the larger animals are known, much additional information will probably be necessary before we obtain a complete acquaintance with the smaller forms. The fact that, amongst the mammals collected in Ladak by Dr. Stoliczka, four (a shrew, a vole, a mouse, and a Lagomys) were previously unknown, and two others incorrectly identified, renders it probable that several more remain to be determined.

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Catalogue Of The Passeriformes or Perching Birds In The Collection Of The British Museum

Cichlomorphae: Part I, containing the families Campophagidae and Muscicapidae

Catalogue Of The Birds In The British Museum, Volume IV

R. Bowdler Sharpe

14 colour plates: J.G. Keulemans

Printed By Order Of The Trustees

Printed by Taylor & Francis

1879

Preface:

"The Fourth Volume of the 'Catalogue of Birds in the British Museum' has been prepared by Mr. R. B. Sharpe, one of the Senior Assistants in the Zoological Department, and author of the three preceding volumes. It contains an account of all the species of Campophagidae and Muscicapidae known at present. From the author's account it would appear that nearly one fourth of the species known are still unrepresented in the British Museum; and the hope may be expressed that ornithologists and collectors will assist in rendering this part of the National collection more complete than it is at present."
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Ornithological Miscellany, Volume III

Editor: George Dawson Rowley

Illustrations: J.G. Keulemans and others

Turner & Co

1878

Includes articles by:

  • M. Adolphe Boucard
  • A.B. Meyer
  • J.H. Gurney
  • Liet-Col. N. Prjelvasky
  • George Dawson Rowley
  • P.J. Sclater
  • R. Bowdler Sharpe
  • Arthur, Marquis of Tweeddale
  • Count Casimir Wodeicki
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Catalogue Of The Passeriformes or Perching Birds In The Collection Of The British Museum

Coliomorphae, containing the families Corvidae, Paradiseidae, Oriolidae, Dicruridae and Prionopidae

Catalogue Of The Birds In The British Museum, Volume III

R. Bowdler Sharpe

13 colour plates: J.G. Keulemans

Printed By Order Of The Trustees

Printed by Taylor & Francis

1877

Preface:

"The Third Volume of the 'Catalogue of Birds in the British Museum ' has been prepared by Mr. R. B. Sharpe, one of the Senior Assistants in the Zoological Department, and author of the two preceding volumes. It contains the commencement of the account of all the species of Passerine Birds known at present; and as no similar monograph of these Birds has been published since the year 1850, it may be hoped that the present work will not only assist the numerous students of this portion of the British Museum collections, but also prove useful to ornithologists, travellers, and collectors."
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Ornithologie d'Angola

J.V. Barboza Du Bocage

10 colour plates: J. G. Keulemans

Lisbonne: Imprimerie Nationale

1877

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Ornithological Miscellany, Volume II

Editor: George Dawson Rowley

Illustrations: J.G. Keulemans

Turner & Co

1877

Includes articles by:

  • Dr. G. Finch
  • Alfred Newton
  • Liet-Col. N. Prjelvasky
  • George Dawson Rowley
  • P.J. Sclater
  • R. Bowdler Sharpe
  • R. Swinhoe
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A Monograph Of The Nectariniidae, Or, Family Of Sun-Birds

Captain G.E. Shelley

Plates: J.G. Keulemans

Published by the author

1876-1880

From the introduction:

"I believe that my first attraction towards the family of Sun-birds took place in Nubia, where I fell in with Hedydipna metallica, the first truly tropical form of bird that I had ever procured. The sense of pleasure with which I preserved my first specimens of this beautiful little species on the banks of the Nile above the First Cataract, and the engaging habits of the species, impressed me so much, that on all my subsequent visits to the African continent I paid especial attention to the Sun-birds in each country I visited. At that time, in the year 1870, I believe that both the late Marquis of Tweeddale and Mr. Bowdler Sharpe contemplated the production of a Monograph of the Nectariniidae; and it was only on their making no signs in this direction that, after the lapse of some years, I commenced to write the present work. If I have succeeded in reducing the family to a better state of order than it before exhibited, it is in a great measure due to the kindly assistance which I have received from ornithologists in all parts of the world, while at the same time I feel that I have left no stone unturned, nor spared any pains in my endeavour to make my Monograph as complete as circumstances would allow."

"The illustrations, which form such an important portion of my Monograph, have all been executed by Mr. Keulemans, whose name is sufficient guarantee for the accuracy of the details and for high artistic skill. The latter is rendered perhaps more striking from his being acquainted with this family of birds in their native haunts ; and his notes upon the Sun-birds inhabiting Prince's Island have been incorporated in my work."

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On The Avifauna Of The Galapagos Archipelago

Osbert Salvin

5 colour plates: J.G. Keulemans

Vol IX, Part IX

Transactions of the Zoological Society of London

1876

A paper from the Transactions of the Zoological Society of London.

From the opening lines:

"In the volume of the Society's 'Proceedings' for 1870 Mr. Sclater and I published a brief summary of an important collection of birds made by Dr. Habel in the Galapagos Islands. The object of the present memoir is to give the particulars of that collection in greater detail, to incorporate the notes on the habits and other peculiarities of the birds drawn up by Dr. Habel himself, and to treat generally of the avifauna of this singular group of islands. To make my paper more complete I have added a short account of the history, structure, and physical features of the islands with regard to their bearing on the indigenous products. This account is drawn from the writings of various travellers; and to it I have added an account of his visit, furnished by Dr. Habel himself."
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Eastern Persia an Account of the Journeys of the Persian Boundary Commission 1870-71-72:

Volume I: Geography, Volume II: Zoology and Geology

Majors St .John, Lovett and Euan Smith (Volume I) / W.T. Blanford (Volume II)

Introduction: Major-General Sir Frederic John Goldsmid

Illustrations (Volume II): J.G. Keulemans, G.H. Ford

Macmillan & Co

1876

Fron the introduction to volume II:

"The materials from which the following partial sketch of the vertebrate fauna of Persia has been mainly derived are two collections, - the first made by Major St. John, with the assistance of a native collector sent from the Indian Museum in Calcutta, in the years 1869-70-71; the second that formed by myself with similar aid whilst accompanying Major St. John in 1872 in his journey from Gwfidar in Baluchistan to Shiraz, Isfahai, and Tehran. To this collection also Major St. John contributed largely. The whole of the first collection, comprising more than five hundred specimens of birds and mammals, has been liberally entrusted to me by the Trustees of the Indian Museum for comparison and description. The reptiles collected by Major St. John have already been examined and described by Dr. Anderson, Curator of the Indian Museum, but I have had the advantage of comparing the types described by him, which have been sent to me for the purpose. The specimens of fish and invertebrata being comparatively few in number, the present notes are chiefly confined to the four vertebrate classes of mammals, birds, reptiles, and amphibia."
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Ornithological Miscellany, Volume I

Editor: George Dawson Rowley

Illustrations: J.G. Keulemans

Turner & Co

1876

Preface:

"In launching forth the 'Ornithological Miscellany' it is a source of much regret that I am unable to say how many Numbers will be published, or when they are likely to appear; nor can I even tell to which departments of ornithology, fossil or recent, they may be devoted. My single idea, as a working ornithologist, is to try and advance that science in any way possible. I love it much, and am unable to confine my view exclusively to any one of the zoogeographical regions now adopted by zoologists, and first established by Dr. Sclater. Number I. relates exclusively to the ornis of New Zealand, on account of the recent discovery there of a new species of Apteryx. All the Illustrations have been executed by Mr. Keulemans - the birds from specimens set up by Mr. Swaysland, in my own collection, received by me direct from New Zealand. I have in no instance used the writings of others without acknowledgment. In conclusion, my best reward will be the approval, if I fortunately obtain it, of those to whom the work is dedicated, and any others who may kindly do me the favour to read it."
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Catalogue Of The Striges In The Collection Of The British Museum

Catalogue Of The Birds In The British Museum, Volume II

R. Bowdler Sharpe

14 colour plates: J.G. Keulemans

Printed By Order Of The Trustees

Printed by Taylor & Francis

1875

Preface:

" The Second Volume of the 'Catalogue of Birds in the British Museum' has been prepared by Mr. R. B. Sharpe, one of the Senior Assistants in the Zoological Department; it contains an account of all the species of Nocturnal Birds of Prey known at present, with a complete list of references to the literature. Every effort has been made to render the Collection in the British Museum as complete as possible, and to enable the author to overcome the unusual difficulties that present themselves in this family of Birds as regards the discrimination of the species, as well as their description."
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Onze Vogels in huis en tuin: deel III

J.G. Keulemans

P.W.M. Trap

1876

The third part of Keuleman's 3 part publication which translate literally as 'Our birds in the house and garden'.

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Anatomical And Zoological Researches: Comprising An Account Of The Zoological Results Of The Two Expeditions To Western Yunnan In 1868 And 1875

First Volume: Text

Second Volume: Plates

John Anderson

Illustrations: J.G. Keulemans, and others

Bernard Quaritch

1876

J.G. Keulemans contributed bird and mammal plates to the second volume.

From the introduction:

"This work was originally intended to be confined to a description of the Zoological Results of the two Yunnan Expeditions. In working them out, however, I was led to examine certain Asiatic genera as a whole; and having done so, I have embraced the opportunity to incorporate these observations along with the results of the Expeditions, as they were founded, in the majority of cases, on the actual comparison of the types of the individual species; hence the descriptions of the various species of Sylobates, Macacus, Semnopithecus, Sciurus, &c."
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A Birds Of South Africa

Edgar Leopold Layard

Editor: R. Bowdler Sharpe

Illustrations by J.G. Keulemans and others

Bernard Quaritch

New edition

1875 to 1884

From the introduction:

"Although several species of birds from South Africa were known to the early writers, and are to be found figured and described in the pages of Brisson, and Linnaeus, Sparrmann, Gmelin, and Latham, it was not until the beginning of the present century, when Levaillant published his "Oiseaux d'Afrique," that any connected history of the ornithology of Africa was attempted. Levaillant resided principally in the southern portion of the Cape Colony, and many of his accounts of the habits of the birds are exceedingly good, and evidently taken from personal observation, but it is greatly to be regretted that his work contains a large number of species introduced into the book as African which are in reality inhabitants of totally different countries ; in fact, on many occasions he admits the circumstance."
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St. Helena: A Physical, Historical, And Topographical Description Of The Island, Including Its Geology, Fauna, Flora, And Meteorology

John Charles Melliss

Illustrations: J.G. Keulemans (one plate), Vincent Brooks, J.C. Melliss, E.W. Robinson, J.N. Fitch

L. Reeve & Co

1875

From the preface:

"There is perhaps no other spot in the whole world which geographically presents so great an interest to the naturalist as St. Helena. A small Island, distinctly of volcanic origin, bearing no trace whatever of any continental land having existed nearer to it than a thousand miles or more, and yet possessing plants and insects that have not been found elsewhere in the world, at once suggest the inquiry, How did these things get there? The interest attaching to such a question was revealed to me by the late Sir William Hooker, about thirteen years ago, when he led me to see in the peculiar Fauna and Flora of such a spot subjects of the greatest scientific value."
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Catalogue Of The Accipitres or Diurnal Birds Of Prey In The Collection Of The British Museum

Catalogue Of The Birds In The British Museum, Volume I

R. Bowdler Sharpe

14 colour plates: J.G. Keulemans

Printed By Order Of The Trustees

Printed by Taylor & Francis

1874

Preface:

"This volume contains a complete account of all the species of Diurnal Birds of Prey known at present, 377 in number, of which only about twenty-five are desiderata in the Collection of the British Museum. In the year 1848, when the Catalogue of Accipitres prepared by the late Mr. George Robert Gray was published by order of the Trustees, 198 species were contained in the Museum. This Catalogue has been prepared by Mr. R. B. Sharpe, one of the Senior Assistants in the Department of Zoology."
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Onze Vogels in huis en tuin: deel II

J.G. Keulemans

P.W.M. Trap

1873

The second part of Keuleman's 3 part publication which translate literally as 'Our birds in the house and garden'.

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Lahore to Yarkand. Incidents of the Route and Natural History of the Countries traversed by the Expedition of 1870

George Henderson and Allan O. Hume

Illustrations of birds: J.G. Keulemans

Illustrations of plants: J.N. Fitch

Plus other plates and a folding map

L. Reeve & Co

1873

From the preface:

"On the return to India of the Yarkand Expedition it was believed that sufficient materials had been collected, during the journey, for a paper in some scientific journal, on the Zoology and Botany of the countries traversed, but in preparing the notes for the press it was soon found that their bulk was so great as to necessitate a separate volume.
...
The Ornithological portion of the work has been edited by Mr. R. B. Sharpe, and Mr. H. W. Bates has exercised a general supervision over the work, whilst it was passing through the press.
...
The Plates of Birds are all by Keulemans, and with scarcely an exception they are all very accurately done."
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A History Of The Birds Of New Zealand

Walter Lawry Buller

Illustrations: J.G. Keulemans

John Van Voorst

1872-1873

From the preface:

"The study of Ornithology has always been a source of intense enjoyment to me; and to write a history of the Birds of my native country was one of the day-dreams of my early boyhood. In maturer years my intervals of leisure, during an active official life in the colony, have been chiefly devoted to the collection of materials for such an undertaking; and the result is now presented to the public in a form which will, I trust, be acceptable to both the scientific and the general reader. With what amount of success I have executed my self-imposed task it is not for me to decide. I am conscious, however, of having bestowed much honest labour upon it; and the highly favourable manner in which it has been reviewed, as well as the numerous letters of commendation and approval which I have received from persons in every way competent to form a judgment, give me reason to believe that my efforts have not been misdirected. As a proof that I have spared myself no trouble to make the work complete I may mention that, without a single exception, the descriptions of the species have been taken from specimens actually before me, and that every measurement given throughout the book has been made or verified by myself. The life-histories are, for the most part, records of my own observations during a number of years; and I have endeavoured to make them as truthful as possible. It will be seen, however, that I have not failed to avail myself of the notes of other local naturalists, whose contributions are, in every instance, duly acknowledged."
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A Monograph of the Phasianidae or Family of the Pheasants

Daniel Giraud Elliot

Colour plates: Joseph Wolf, Joseph Smit, J.G. Keulemans

Published by the author

1872

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A Handbook To The Birds Of Egypt

G.E. Shelley

2 colour plates: J.G. Keulemans

John Van Voorst

1872

From the introduction:

"I shall commence with a short account of my personal experiences in Egypt, in order to give the reader some idea of the nature of the country and the best localities for the ornithologist and sportsman to visit. I shall then give a more complete list than has been hitherto published, with a description of each species, of the birds which are undoubtedly to be found in Egypt between the Mediterranean and the Second Cataract, to which limits my observations have been confined. In the following pages the greater portion of the information given is derived from my own personal observation, the result of three ornithological tours which I have made in Egypt, and from a collection of nearly a thousand skins which are now in my possession. In my descriptions of the birds, I have endeavoured to point out the characters by which they may be most easily recognized, and have placed in italics the characteristic points by which allied species may be distinguished from one another. I have given plates of a few of the most interesting species which have come under my notice ; some of these have never been figured before ; and in order to facilitate the naming and classification of the specimens when brought home, I have referred at the end of each description to some good figure of the species, selecting as often as possible from the four following works : - Gould's 'Birds of Asia,' his 'Birds of Europe,' and the works on the latter subject by Messrs. Sharpe and Dresser, and Dr. Bree."
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A History Of The Birds Of Europe, Volume VIII

Scolopacidae, Laridae, Procellariidae, Alcidae, Colymbidae, Podicipitidae

Henry E. Dresser

Illustrations: J.G. Keulemans, J. Wolf, E. Neale, and others

Published by the author

1871-1881

For more detail about this publication see the A History Of The Birds Of Europe.

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A History Of The Birds Of Europe, Volume VII

Columbae, Galinae, Grallae, Otidae, Oedicnemidae, Glareolidae, Charadriidae, Scolopacidae

Henry E. Dresser

Illustrations: J.G. Keulemans, J. Wolf, E. Neale, and others

Published by the author

1871-1881

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A History Of The Birds Of Europe, Volume VI

Falconidae, Pelecanidae, Ardeidae, Ciconiidae, Plataleidae, Phoenicopteridae, Anatidae

Henry E. Dresser

Illustrations: J.G. Keulemans, J. Wolf, E. Neale, and others

Published by the author

1871-1881

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A History Of The Birds Of Europe, Volume V

Picidae, Alcedinidae, Coraciidae, Meropidae, Upupidae, Cucilidae, Strigidae, Bubonidae, Vultuidae, Falconidae

Henry E. Dresser

Illustrations: J.G. Keulemans, J. Wolf, E. Neale, and others

Published by the author

1871-1881

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A History Of The Birds Of Europe, Volume IV

Fringillinae, Loxiinae, Emberizinae, Alaudidae, Sturnidae, Corvidae, Cypselidae, Caprimulgidae

Henry E. Dresser

Illustrations: J.G. Keulemans, J. Wolf, E. Neale, and others

Published by the author

1871-1881

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A History Of The Birds Of Europe, Volume III

Drymoecinae, Crateropodinae, Accentoridae, Panuridae, Paridae, Sittidae, Certhiidae, Trglodytidae, Motacillidae, Pyconotidae, Oriolidae, Laniidae, Ampelidae, Muscicapidae, Hirundinidae, Fringillinae

Henry E. Dresser

Illustrations: J.G. Keulemans, J. Wolf, E. Neale, and others

Published by the author

1871-1881

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A History Of The Birds Of Europe, Volume II

Turdinae, Cinclinae, Saxicolinae, Sylviinae, Phylloscopinae, Acrocephalinae

Henry E. Dresser

Illustrations: J.G. Keulemans, J. Wolf, E. Neale, and others

Published by the author

1871-1881

For more detail about this publication see the A History Of The Birds Of Europe.

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A Natural History of Cage Birds

J.G. Keulemans

Jan Van Voorst

1871

Originally published in 4 parts.

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A Monograph Of The Capitonidae, Or Scansorial Barbets

C.H.T. Marshall and G.F.L. Marshall

Illustrations: J.G. Keulemans

Published by the authors

1871

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Observations On The Geology And Zoology Of Abyssinia, Made During The Progress Of The British Expedition To That Country In 1867-68

W.T. Blanford

Illustrations: J.G. Keulemans, and others

Macmillan & Co

1870

Includes 6 colour plates by J.G. Keulemans.

Fron the preface:

"The present work contains an account of the Geological and Zoological Observations made by the author in Abyssinia, when accompanying the British army on its march to Magdala and back in 1868, and during a short journey in Northern Abyssinia, after the departure of the troops. The book is divided into three parts. The first of these contains a brief description of the journey, and of some of the principal Geological and Zoological features of the countries visited. The second part is devoted to Geology ; it comprises a brief notice of the observations made by previous explorers, a general account of the formations examined, and a few remarks on the geological configuration of the country. The third part contains the Zoological observations, and consists of an enumeration of the various animals collected, with remarks on their habits, distribution, &c., preceded by a short account of the principal works on Abyssinian Zoology hitherto published, and some brief observations on the relations and distribution of the Abyssinian fauna. A few species of Vertebrata which appear to have escaped the researches of previous explorers are described and figured."
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The Malay Archipelago: The Land Of The Orang-Utan, And The Bird Of Paradise

A Narrative Of Travel, With Studies Of Man And Nature

Alfred Russel Wallace

Illustrations: T. Baines, W.H. Fitch, J.G. Keulemans, E. W. Robinson, J. Wolf, and T. W. Wood

Published in two volumes

Macmillan

1869

There are 7 illustrations by Keulemans. In Volume 1 a flying fox based on a drawing by Wallace. In Volume 2 six Birds Of Paradise illustrations. The Magnificent Bird Of Paradise image from volume 2 is also used on the title page of Volume 1.

From the preface:

"My readers will naturally ask why I have delayed writing this book for six years after my return; and I feel bound to give them full satisfaction on this point. When I reached England in the spring of 1862, I found myself surrounded by a room full of packing cases, containing the collections that I had from time to time sent home for my private use. These comprised nearly three thousand bird-skins, of about a thousand species; and at least twenty thousand beetles and butterflies, of about seven thousand species; besides some quadrupeds and land-shells. A large proportion of these I had not seen for years; and in my then weak state of health, the unpacking, sorting, and arranging of such a mass of specimens occupied a long time. I very soon decided, that until I had done something towards naming and describing the most important groups in my collection, and had worked out some of the more interesting problems of variation and geographical distribution, of which I had had glimpses while collecting them, I would not attempt to publish my travels. I could, indeed, at once have printed my notes and journals, leaving all reference to questions of natural history for a future work; but I felt that this would be as unsatisfactory to myself, as it would be disappointing to my friends, and uninstructive to the public. Since my return, up to this date, I have published eighteen papers, in the Transactions or Proceedings of the Linnean Zoological and Entomological Societies, describing or cataloguing portions of my collections; besides twelve others in various scientific periodicals, on more general subjects connected with them."
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Onze Vogels in huis en tuin: deel 1

J.G. Keulemans

P.W.M. Trap

1869

The first part of Keuleman's 3 part publication which translates literally as 'Our birds in the house and garden.

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A Monograph Of The Alcedinidae Or Family Of Kingfishers

R.B. Sharpe

Illustrations: J.G. Keulemans

Published by the author

1868

From the introduction:

"I OWE the suggestion of the present Monograph to Mr. W. J. Williams, of the Zoological Society, who, in the year 1865, proposed that we should write together a synopsis of the known species of Kingfishers. Owing, however, to increased calls upon his time, Mr. Williams was forced to abandon the project, and the work was dropped for some time. In 1866 I again resumed the task by myself, and have since steadily persevered with the work until I have been at length enabled to bring it to a satisfactory conclusion. I take this opportunity of returning my grateful thanks for their kindness to the many friends who have contributed to the success of the undertaking, and without whose assistance it would have been impossible to finish the book.

...

It would be invidious to say any thing about the way in which my artist, Mr. Keulcmans has performed the task allotted to him. The attention which he has bestowed upon the work merits my highest approbation; and I only regret that in some instances the effect of his beautiful drawings has been marred by the incapacity of the colourists. The department of printing and colouring the plates has been intrusted to Mr. P. W. M. Trap; and though on the whole well executed, I am sorry that I cannot give unqualified praise in some instances."

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Last updated January 2014