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W. H. Hudson: nature writing

This page lists the non-fiction nature writing produced by W.H. Hudson during his lifetime.

The books are ordered by publication date with the most recent at the top.


There are five W.H. Hudson pages on the site:

Nature writing: original books

Nature writing: later collection

Letters / autobiography

Fiction

Biography / bibliography


 

A Hind in Richmond Park

W. H. Hudson

J.M. Dent & Sons

1922

Publisher's note in first edition:

"This book contains the last words of the great naturalist who through the power of his love reveals the beauty of things animate and inanimate in the world in which he lived such a long, full, ecstatic life, in spite of the sadness and loneliness that were always his. The publishers, who have enjoyed his friendship for many years, would wish to join with those who knew the man and his work in offering homage to his memory. "He fell on sleep," August i8th, 1922. The author before his death handed to us the full manuscript of the book with the exception of the last chapter, which he said wanted a little revision. Part of this was in clear typescript, but the last few pages, amounting to some two thousand words, were in his handwriting and exceedingly difficult to decipher. We wish to put on record our thanks to his old friend Mr. Morley Roberts for the loving, patient care which he gave to the work of interpretation, in which he has succeeded in making plain the closing pages of the book, and also to Mr. Charles Lee for his valuable assistance in seeing the book through the press."

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Seagulls In London

W. H. Hudson

Privately printed by Clement K. Shorter

1922

A limited edition 4 page leaflet. The text was originally published as a letter in The Observer in January 1921.

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A Traveller in Little Things

W. H. Hudson

J.M. Dent & Sons

1921

Note: "Of the sketches contained in this volume, fourteen have appeared in the following periodicals: The New Statesman, The Saturday Renew, The Nation, and The Cornhill Magazine.

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Birds of La Plata

Volume One

W. H. Hudson

Illustrations: H. Gronvold

Illustrations: Henrik Gronvold

1920

Originally published in two volumes.

From the introduction:

"The matter contained in this work is taken from the two volumes of the Argentine Ornithology published in 1888-9, and was my first book on the subject of bird life. The late Philip Lutley Sclater, who wasat that time the chief authority in this country on South American Ornithology, collaborated with me in the work to the extent of arranging the material in accordance with the most popular system of classification, and also adding descriptions, synonymy, etc., of the species unknown to me. All this matter which he contributed in order to make the work a complete list, I have thrown out, along with the synonymy of the species described by me. And there was good reason for this simplification, seeing that we cannot have a complete list owing to the fact that fresh species are continually being added to it by the collectors ; these species, new to the list, being mostly intruders or visitors found on the subtropical northern limits of the country. The original work (Argentine Ornithology) was thus out of date as soon as published, and the only interest it still retains for the reader is in the account of the birds' habits contributed by me. The work thus being no longer what it was, or was intended to be, a different title had to be found, and I cannot think of a more suitable one than The Birds of La Plata, which indicates that the species treated here are of the Plata country - a district of Argentina, Furthermore, it gives the book its proper place as a companion work to The Naturalist in La Plata. That book, also now old in years, has won a permanent place in the Natural History libraries, and treats of all forms of life observed by me; but as it was written after Argentine Ornithology I kept bird subjects out of it as far as possible, so that the two works should not overlap."

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Birds of La Plata

Volume Two

W. H. Hudson

Illustrations: Henrik Gronvold

J.M. Dent & Sons

1920

Originally published in two volumes.

From the opening lines:

"The Trochilidae, or Humming-birds, a distinctly South American form, are one of the most numerous families of birds on the globe, numbering over 400 known species, and ranging over the entire continent down to Tierra del Fuego. How surprising then to find that of this multitude of species no more than about a dozen are found in the entire Argentine country 1 It only adds to the surprise when it is found that humming-birds of these few species are common enough throughout the country. Even on the almost treeless grassy pampas of Buenos Ayres which are unsuited to the habits of this feathered forest sprite, one species at all events is found every- where. Personally I was acquainted with only three species, and I recall that when living on the open pampas, every season when the white acacia at my home was in flower we had an invasion of Humming-birds. The plantation was divided by avenues of large acacia trees^ about a thousand in all, and as long as the blossoms lasted the little glittering birds were to be seen all over the place, in almost every tree, revelling in the fragrant sweetness; but no sooner were the flowers faded than they were gone, and thereafter two or three pairs only remained to breed and spend the summer months in the plantation. All these birds were of one species the Glittering Humming-bird, but on going a few miles from home to the marsh and forest on the low shores of the Plata river I would find the other two species. I spent a summer, bird- watching, in a herdsman's hut in the marshy forest and used to go out at sunset to a small open space overgrown with viper's-bugloss in flower. There is no flower the Humming-bird likes so well, and he is most busy feeding just before dark. Here, standing among the flowers, I would watch the shining little birds coming and going, each bird spending a minute or two sucking honey, then vanishing back into the shadowy trees, and from fifty to a hundred of them would always be in sight all around me at a time. Here all three species were feeding together; but I was familiar with the habits of only one, the bird I describe here."

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The Book of a Naturalist

W. H. Hudson

Hodder & Stoughton

1919

Preface:

"It is necessary that a book should have a title, and important that this should be descriptive of the book: accordingly, I was pleased with my good fortune and myself when I hit upon one which was not merely descriptive but was attractive as well. This was a long time ago when these studies, essays and sketches of animal life began to accumulate on my hands and I foresaw the book. Unhappily, long before my book was ready my nice title had occurred to some one else and was duly given by Sir E. Ray Lankester to his Diversions of a Naturalist - a collection of papers on a vast variety of subjects which had been appearing serially under another title. I was very much annoyed, not only because he is a big man and I am a little one and my need was therefore greater, but also because it appeared to me better suited to my book than to his. He deals with the deep problems of biology and is not exactly a naturalist in the old original sense of the word - one who is mainly concerned with the "life and conversation of animals," and whose work is consequently more like play than his can be, even when it is Science from an Easy Chair. What then was I to do, seeing that all possible changes had been rung on such general titles as Journals, Letters, Notes, Gleanings, and what not, of a Naturalist? There was no second string to my bow since Recreations had already been used by my friend J. E. Harting for his book. In sheer desperation I took this title, which would fit any work on Natural History ever published. Doubtless it would have been an improvement if I could have put in the "Field" before "Naturalist" to show that it was not a compilation, but the title could not be made longer even by a word. Some of the chapters in this volume now appear for the first time; more of them, however, are taken from or based on articles which have appeared in various periodicals: the Fortnightly Review, National Review, Country Life, Nation, the New Statesman, and others. I am obliged to the Editors of the Times and Chambers's Journal for permission to use two short copyright articles on the Rat and Squirrel which appeared in those journals."

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Birds in Town and Village

W. H. Hudson

J.M. Dent & Sons

1919

Preface: "This book is more than a mere reprint of Birds in a Village first published in 1893. That was my first book about bird life, with some impressions of rural scenes, in England; and, as is often the case with a first book, its author has continued to cherish a certain affection for it. On this account it pleased me when its turn came to be reissued, since this gave me the opportunity of mending some faults in the portions retained and of throwing out a good deal of matter which appeared to me not worth keeping. The first portion, "Birds in a Village" has been mostly rewritten with some fresh matter added, mainly later observations and incidents introduced in illustration of the various subjects discussed. For the concluding portion of the old book, which has been discarded, I have substituted entirely new matter - the part entitled "Birds in a Cornish Village." Between these two long parts there are five shorter essays which I have retained with little alteration, and these in one or two instances are consequently out of date, especially in what was said with bitterness in the essay on "Exotic Birds for Britain" anent the feather-wearing fashion and of the London trade in dead birds and the refusal of women at that time to help us in trying to save the beautiful wild bird life of this country and of the world generally from extermination. Happily, the last twenty years of the life and work of the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds have changed all that, and it would not now be too much to say that all right-thinking persons in this country, men and women, are anxious to see the end of this iniquitous traffic."

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Roff And A Linnet

W. H. Hudson

Humanitarian Society

1918

A 9 page pamphlet.

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Adventures Among Birds

W. H. Hudson

Hutchinson & Co

1913

Note at start of book:

"A considerable portion of the matter contained herein has appeared in the English Review, Cornhill Magazine, Saturday Review, Nation, and a part of one chapter in the Morning Post. These articles have been altered and extended, and I am obliged to the editors and publishers for permission to use them in this book."

An apology (the opening of chapter 1):

"The book-buyer in search of something to read before making his purchase as a rule opens a book and glances at a few lines on the first page, just to get the flavour of it and find out whether or not it suits his palate. The title, we must presume, has already attracted him as indicating a subject which interests him. This habit of his gives me the opportunity of warning him at the very outset that he will find here no adventures of a wild-fowler, if that's what he is seeking; no thrilling records of long nights passed in a punt, with a north wind blowing and freezing him to the marrow in spite of his thick woollen clothing and long boots and oilskins, and the glorious conclusion of the adventure when he happily succeeds in sending a thousand pellets of burning lead into an innumerable multitude of mallard, widgeon, teal, pochard, and pintail ; how for several successive winters he repeated the operation until the persecuted fowl began to diminish so greatly in numbers that he forsook that estuary or haunt on the coast to follow them elsewhere, or transferred his attentions to some other far-distant point, where other wholesale killers had not been before him. No, this is not a sporting record, despite the title, and if long titles were the fashion nowadays, it would have been proper to call the book "The Adventures of a Soul, sensitive or not, among the feathered masterpieces of creation." This would at all events have shown at once whence the title was derived, and would have better served to indicate the nature of the contents. It all comes to this, that we have here another book about birds, which demands some sort of apology."

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Buy recent reprint from amazon.co.uk

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On Liberating Caged Birds

W. H. Hudson

Royal Society For The Protection Of Birds

1913

A 6 page leaflet.

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A Thrush That Never Lived

W. H. Hudson

Royal Society For The Protection Of Birds

1911

A 4 page leaflet.

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A Shepherd's Life: Impressions of the South Wiltshire Downs

W. H. Hudson

Illustrations: Bernard C Gotch

Methuen & Co

1910

Note:

"I am obliged to Messrs. Longmans, Green, &Co., for permission to make use of an article entitled "A Shepherd of the Downs," which appeared in the October and November numbers of "Longmans' Magazine," in 1902. With the exception of that article, portions of which I have incorporated in different chapters, the whole of the matter contained in this work now appears for the first time."

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Afoot in England

W. H. Hudson

Hutchinson & Co

1909

Note:

"About half the matter contained in this volume has appeared in various papers and periodicals the Saturday Review, the Speaker, the Morning Post; one article in the English Review; one in Longman's Magazine. The chapter entitled "Rural Rides" is based on a Saturday Review paper, which was afterwards included in a volume edited by Mr. Harold Hodge, entitled Recreations and Reflections. I have to thank the editors for permission to make use of this material."

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Land's End. A Naturalist's Impressions in West Cornwall

W. H. Hudson

Hutchinson & Co

1908

Note:

"About a fourth part of the matter contained in this volume has appeared in the Saturday Review and the Speaker and I am obliged to the editors of those journals for their permission to use it here."

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Hampshire Days

W. H. Hudson

Longmans, Green, And Co.

1903

Note:

"The greater part of the matter contained in this volume has not appeared before. In the first half of the book use has been made of an article on "Summer in the Forest" from Longman's Magazine; in the second half I have drawn on articles from the same periodical, on "Wolmer Forest", "A Summers End on the lichen" and "Selborne Revisited" and I have also made use of an article entitled "A More or Less Happy Family" from the Badminton Magazine."

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Birds and Man

W. H. Hudson

Longmans, Green, And Co.

1901

Note:

"About half or a little more than half the matter contained in this volume has appeared in various periodicals, and I am obliged to the editors and proprietors of the following publications for permission to use this material: Longman's Magazine, Idler, Badminton Magazine, Pall Mall Gazette, Saturday Review, Humane Review, and Contemporary Review. Some of the chapters in the book have been based on short articles, and the introductory chapter is entirely new."

Opening lines:

"Years ago, in a chapter concerning eyes in a book of Patagonian memories, I spoke of the unpleasant sensations produced in me by the sight of stuffed birds. Not bird skins in the drawers of a cabinet, it will be understood, these being indispensable to the ornithologist, and very useful to the larger class of persons who without being ornithologists yet take an intelligent interest in birds. The unpleasantness was at the sight of skins stuffed with wool and set up on their legs in imitation of the living bird, sometimes (oh mockery !) in their "natural surroundings." These "surroundings" are as a rule constructed or composed of a few handfuls of earth to form the floor of the glass case - sand, rock, clay, chalk, or gravel; whatever the material may be it invariably has, like all "matter out of place," a grimy and depressing appearance. On the floor are planted grasses, sedges, and miniature bushes, made of tin or zinc and then dipped in a bucket of green paint. In the chapter referred to it was said, "When the eye closes in death, the bird, except to the naturalist, becomes a mere bundle of dead feathers; crystal globes may be put into the empty sockets, and a bold life - imitating attitude given to the stuffed specimen, but the vitreous orbs shoot forth no lifelike glances: the 'passion and the fire whose fountains are within' have vanished, and the best work of the taxidermist, who has given a life to his bastard art, produces in the mind only sensations of irritation and disgust." That, in the last clause, was wrongly writ. It should have been my mind, and the minds of those who, knowing living birds intimately as I do, have the same feeling about them."

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Nature in Downland

W. H. Hudson

Longmans, Green, And Co.

1900

Opening lines:

"On one of the hottest days in August of this exceptionally hot year of 1899, I spent a good many hours on the top of Kingston Hill, near Lewes. There are clear mornings, especially in the autumn months, when magnificent views of the surrounding country can be had from the flat top of that very long hill. Usually on hot summer days the prospect, with the sea of downland and the grey glinting ocean beyond on one side, the immense expanse of the wooded Sussex weald on the other, is covered with a blue obscuring haze, and this hot, windy August day was no exception. The wind, moreover, was so violent that all winged life, whether of bird or insect, had been driven into hiding and such scanty shade as existed ; it was a labour even to walk against the wind. In spite of these drawbacks, and of the everywhere brown parched aspect of nature, I had here some hours of rare pleasure, felt all the more because it had not been looked for. Kingston Hill is not one of the dome-shaped downs, where when not on the very summit you are on a slope : the top forms a level plateau or table-land of considerable extent, covered with a thick turf and occasional patches of furze, with some bramble and elder bushes. After aimlessly wandering about over this high plain for some time I went to a spot where the hill sloped away toward the valley of the Ouse. Beyond the vast sweep of parched ground beneath me, green meadows and trees were visible, with scattered village and farm houses, and the two small churches of Iford and Kingston vaguely seen in the haze."

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The Trade In Birds' Feathers

W. H. Hudson

Society For The Protection Of Birds

1898

A 6 page leaflet. The text was originally printed as a letter to The Times in December 1897.

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Birds in London

W. H. Hudson

Longmans, Green, And Co.

1898

From the preface:

"The opening chapter contains, by way of introduction, all that need be said concerning the object and scope of this work; it remains to say here that, as my aim has been to furnish an account of the London wild bird life of to-day, there was little help to be had from the writings of previous observers. These mostly deal with the central parks, and are interesting now, mainly, as showing the changes that have taken place. At the end of the volume a list will be found of the papers and books on the subject which are known to me. This list will strike many readers as an exceedingly meagre one, when it is remembered that London has always been a home of ornithologists - that from the days of Oliver Goldsmith, who wrote pleasantly of the Temple Gardens rookery, and of Thomas Pennant and his friend Daines Barrington, there have never been wanting observers of the wild bird life within our gates. The fact remains that, with the exception of a few incidental passages to be found in various ornithological works, nothing was expressly written about the birds of London until James Jennings's 'Ornithologia' saw the light a little over seventy years ago. Jennings's work was a poem, probably the worst ever written in the English language; but as he inserted copious notes, fortunately in prose, embodying his own observations on the bird life of east and south-east London, the book has a very considerable interest for us to-day. Nothing more of importance appeared until the late Shirley Hibberd's lively paper on 'London Birds' in 1865. From that date onward the subject has attracted an increased attention, and at present we have a number of London or park naturalists, as they might be called, who view the resident London species as adapted to an urban life, and who chronicle their observations in the 'Field,' 'Nature,' 'Zoologist,' 'Nature Notes,' and other natural history journals, and in the newspapers and magazines. To return to the present work. Treating of actualities I have been obliged for the most part to gather my own materials, relying perhaps too much on my own observation; since London is now too vast a field for any person, however diligent, to know it intimately in all its extent."

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Pipits

W.H. Hudson

Editor: H. E. Dresser

Educational Series No. 21

Society for the Protection of Birds

1890's

A 4 page guide that covers the Meadow Pipit, Tree Pipit and Rock Pipit. Provides a brief description and information on distribution, numbers, food, characteristics, protection, plus two pages of general remarks.

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The Barn Owl

W. H. Hudson

Society For The Protection Of Birds

1895

A 10 page leaflet.

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British Birds

W.H. Hudson

Chapter on structure and classification: Frank E. Beddard

Longmans, Green & Co.

1895

360 pages with 8 colour plates by A. Thorburn, 8 black and white plates by G.E. Lodge and over 100 smaller black and white drawings by Lodge.

From the authors introduction:

The plan followed in the descriptive portion of this work has, I trust, the merit of simplicity. A brief account is given of the appearance, language, and life-habits of all the species that reside permanently, or for a portion of each year, within the limits of the British Islands. The accidental stragglers, with the irregular or occasional visitors, have been included, but not described, in the work. To have omitted all mention of them would, perhaps, have been to carry the process of simplification too far. And as much may be said of the retention in this book of Latin, or science names. The mass of technical matter with which ornithological works are usually weighted is scarcely wanted in a book intended for the general reader, more especially for the young. Nor was there space sufficient to make the work at the same time a technical and a popular one : the briefest description that could possibly be given of the characters of genera would have occupied thirty to forty pages. The student must, in any case, go to the large standard works on the subject, especially to those of Yarrell (fourth edition), Seebohm, and Howard Saunders, which are repositories of all the most important facts relating to our bird life, gathered from the time of Willughby, the father of British ornithology, down to the present.
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Lost British Birds

W. H. Hudson

Drawings: A.D. McCormick

Society For The Protection Of Birds

1894

A 32 page booklet.

Opening lines:

"The species described as lost in this paper, are those which were summer residents and breeders, or inhabitants all the year round, of some part of Great Britain, but which no longer breed in this country and visit our shores only as rare stragglers, or, bi-annually, in their migrations to and from their breeding areas on the continent of Europe. In other words, if the British race be extinct the species is here regarded as lost, however abundant it may be elsewhere. Perhaps it would be safer to say if practically extinct; since I have included species of which one or two pairs are still known to breed within the kingdom. In the case of the ruff and reeve, for instance, Professor Newton is inclined to think that I have been a "little premature." Taking the word "lost" in this restricted sense, I do not think that ornithologists will find that I am very much out in my list, which I have been assisted in making by two friends, both authorities in questions of this kind Mr. J. E. Harting, and Professor Newton himself. It is certainly difficult to know where to draw the line, and having once determined to include species that are practically extinct, like the hen harrier and the ruff and reeve, there were others, like the osprey and sea-eagle, which it seemed unreasonable to omit. But it was necessary to draw the line somewhere, and it was thought best to leave out any species represented by at least three or four pairs that have some measure of protection afforded to them when breeding. The statement is often made that the total disappearance of some species of birds, and the extreme rarity of others, once common in this country, is due to the draining of the marshes, an improved system of cultivation, and kindred causes; and there is no doubt that some aquatic birds that breed in communities would suffer greatly from the breaking up of their ancestral nesting-places. But when we look into the facts relating to the disappearance of the species noticed in this paper, we find that most of them were lost through the direct action of man. Fowlers, gamekeepers, collectors, cockney sportsmen, and louts with guns, pursued them to the death, even as they are now pursuing all our rarer species.

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Bird-Catching

W. H. Hudson & W.L. Woodroffe

Society For The Protection Of Birds

1893

A 4 page leaflet.

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Feathered Women

W. H. Hudson

Society For The Protection Of Birds

1893

A 1 page leaflet.

Originally published as a letter to The Times in October 1893.

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Birds in a Village

W. H. Hudson

Chapman and Hall

1893

A collection of 6 essays, some of which had been previously published in magazines and journals.

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The Naturalist in la Plata

W. H. Hudson

Illustrations: J. Smit

Chapman and Hall

1892

Preface:

"The plan I have followed in this little work has been to sift and arrange the facts I have gathered concerning the habits of the animals best known to me, preserving those only, which, in my judgment, appeared worth recording. In some instances a variety of subjects have linked themselves together in my mind, and have been grouped under one heading; consequently the scope of the book is not indicated by the list of contents: this want is, however, made good by an index at the end. It is seldom an easy matter to give a suitable name to a book of this description. I am conscious that the one I have made choice of displays a lack of originality; also, that this kind of title has been used hitherto for works constructed more or less on the plan of the famous Naturalist on the Amazon. After I have made this apology the reader, on his part, will readily admit that, in treating of the Natural History of a district so well known, and often described as the southern portion of La Plata, which has a temperate climate, and where nature is neither exuberant nor grand, a personal narrative would have seemed superfluous. The greater portion of the matter contained in this volume has already seen the light in the form of papers contributed to the Field, with other journals that treat of Natural History; and to the monthly magazines - Longmans, The Nineteenth Century, The Gentleman's Magazine, and others: I am indebted to the Editors and Proprietors of these periodicals for kindly allowing me to make use of this material. Of all animals, birds have perhaps afforded me most pleasure; but most of the fresh knowledge I have collected in this department is contained in a larger work (Argentine Ornithology), of which Dr. P. L. Sclater is part author. As I have not gone over any of the subjects dealt with in that work, bird-life has not received more than a fair share of attention in the present volume."

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Osprey; or, Egrets and Aigrettes

W. H. Hudson

Society For The Protection Of Birds

1891

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Argentine Ornithology: A Descriptive Catalogue Of The Birds Of The Argentine Republic, Volume 2

P. L. Sclater

With notes on their habits by: W. H. Hudson

Colour plates: J.G. Keulemans

R.H. Porter

1889

Preface (by P. L. Sclater):

" This volume contains our account of all the Orders of Birds met with within the Argentine Republic except the Passeres, which were treated of in the First Volume. It also comprises an Appendix and Index, and completes the work. The Introduction is issued with this, but is intended to be bound up with the first volume, and is paged to follow the contents of that volume. The total number of species which we have thus assigned to the Argentine Avifauna is 434. To this list, no doubt, considerable additions will have to be made when the more remote provinces of the Republic have been explored. We trust that this work may at least serve to excite residents in Argentina to make fresh investigations, for we are quite aware how imperfect is the compilation now offered to the public. It will be seen that in the following pages, as in the first volume, we have availed ourselves liberally of the information on Argentine birds contained in the writings of Dr. Burmeister, Mr. Barrows, and Mr. Gibson. To all of these gentlemen we wish to offer our most sincere thanks, together with apologies for the liberty we have taken. We have likewise to express our high estimation of the valuable notes which we have extracted from the published writings of the late Henry Durnford and Ernest William White, both most promising Naturalists, and both alike lost to Science at an early age. Nor must we omit to record our thanks to Hans, Graf von Berlepsch, of Miinderi, Mr. Walter B. Barrows, and Mr. Frank Withington, and other friends and correspondents who have aided us by information and by the loan of specimens. To the Zoological Society of London and to Mr. Henry Seebohm we are likewise much indebted for the loan of the woodcuts of which impressions are contained in these volumes."

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Argentine Ornithology: A Descriptive Catalogue Of The Birds Of The Argentine Republic, Volume 1

P. L. Sclater

With notes on their habits by: W. H. Hudson

Colour plates: J.G. Keulemans

R.H. Porter

1888

Preface (by P. L. Sclater):

"The present volume contains an account of the Passeres of the Argentine Republic, which, as at present known, number some 229 species. The second volume, which it is hoped will be ready in the course of next year, will be devoted to the history of the remaining Orders of Birds, and will also contain the Introduction and Index, and complete the work. All the personal observations recorded in these pages are due to Mr. Hudson, while I am responsible for the arrangement, nomenclature, and scientific portions of the work. I have to acknowledge with many thanks a donation of 40 from the Royal Society, which has enabled Mr. Hudson to devote a portion of his time to the compilation of his interesting notes."

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Last updated August 2013